Monday, May 2, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HyEndFed 5 Band HF Antenna Installation. Post #764.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/kGyAveQsf60.  Here's another antenna idea for those of us living on small city lots.  In this video, Tracy ("Outdoors On The Air") uses a HyEndFed 5 Band HF Antenna to get some interesting contacts on a cold day. His 75-foot/22.86 meter end-fed antenna seems to do well, even without a counterpoise wire or extensive radial ground system.  I've found that end-fed wires usually need a counterpoise or radial system to function at peak efficiency and to keep unwanted rf out of the shack. I usually keep it simple:  I attach a counterpoise wire for the lowest frequency in use to the ground lug of my Drake MN-4 antenna transmatch.  That seems to work fairly well and keeps rf outside where it belongs.  None the less, Tracy's video is well-done and offers plenty of suggestions for those radio amateurs living in compromised situations. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Stealth HF Antenna for your HOA Yes it can be done! - AF5DN


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/mLDeuEyV_qM. A helpful, well-paced tutorial on how to set up a stealth antenna in a home or apartment governed by an HOA or CC&R. The task of designing, building, and installing a stealth antenna is no easy task, but if you are careful and pay attention to the geography, natural features, and building arrangement of your HOA/CC&R home, you can succeed in getting a working antenna for your location.  Be sure to have an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") and a counterpoise or ground radial system in place. You can either build your own antenna or use a commercial model from such companies as Maple Leaf Studios.  This is post #763 of a continuing series on Simple Ham Radio Antennas.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--DX80 HOA Hell stealth setup. Post #762.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your brower search box: https://youtu.be/0nsomb-V-3s.  Operating in a HOA/CC&R restricted area presents some unique challenges.  Antennas must be "stealthy" (unseen), simple, easily deployed, and quickly taken down if suspicions are raised by your neighbors.  While this stealth installation of a RadioWavz 80 OCF (off center-fed) dipole is a bit complicated, it can be done quite quickly if you plan carefully and avoid prying eyes during the installation phase.  Please note how this radio amateur uses a privacy fence, trees, and property geography to hide this antenna from public view.  Although this antenna arrangement won't beat a 3-element yagi on the bands, it will get you on the air with a decent signal without being seen.  A basic rule applies:  Out of sight, out of mind.  Good luck. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, April 29, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Underground HF Antenna, 40 meter Loop-Survival Podcast. Post #761

Underground HF Antenna, 40 meter Loop--Survival Podcast
(https://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=51280.0).
Accessed on 30 April 2016, 02:06 hrs, UTC.
Reporter:  Carl, "Mr. Ham Tastic."

Comment:

If you need the ultimate stealth antenna, why not use a subsurface 40 meter loop suggested by the author of this intriguing article?  For a slight sacrifice in receive strength, you can get a reduced noise level plus the added attraction of using an "invisible" antenna.  Carl built a 154-foot/46.95 meter loop and placed in beneath his yard.  The antenna is quiet, nearly invisible, and fairly cheap.  Although you do get a signal that's 2-3 dB below a regular dipole, regular noise is reduced considerably, so the trade-off may be worth pursuing.  Underground antennas have been used for years by the world's major military powers, and there is no reason why you can't discover the benefits of this antenna as well. Other ground-mounted antennas can work fairly well on the lower HF and MF broadcast bands.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check ou the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!
Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Ham Radio MARS Counter Poise Ground Saturn Dipole Antenna


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your search box: https://youtu.be/J9a1mAAtSbE.  This easy to understand video from http://www.radiowavz.com shows how adding a simple counterpoise or radial ground system can greatly enhance the quality of an antenna.  A good ground radial system is especially important for vertical antennas, since the radial system supplies "the missing half" of a vertical antenna system.  The intent of the video is to show that radials do make a difference in antenna performance.  I'll cover the "nuts and bolts" of ground radial systems in a future post.  But, for now, this video gives you an indication of just how important a ground radial system is to most antennas.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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