Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--High Sierra HF mobile antenna setup. Post #876.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v-hZ73hY1dPIY.  The High Sierra HF mobile antenna system is one of the most popular antennas for mobile and even portable use.  In this video, VA3HRY shows us how he set up the antenna using a trailer hitch to support the antenna mast. Be sure to ground your antenna to the metal portion of your vehicle.  Many cars and trucks have been made with tough plastics and fiberglass, and metal may be hard to find. A nice setup--very well thought out.

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Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Conical Monopole Antenna. Post #875.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sScrfbf0uIg. Here's an interesting and somewhat complex wideband HF antenna that you may find useful.  In this video, Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) explains the theory, construction, and operation of the Conical Monopole Antenna.  You may need some help in building this antenna.  This antenna would make a good club project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, August 22, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Vehicle Antenna Installation - NMO Mount (corrected copy)


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v-hFR4SASOKhg. This is post #874. Like many of my ham radio friends, I use a mag mount antenna for my VHF/UHF mobile activity. While a mag mount is convenient, it can leave scratches and other imperfections on your vehicle's roof or rear deck. A really professional installation that looks nice, is weather resistant, and is more efficient calls for a NMO mount--the type that two-way radio shops use for Motorola radios in taxi cabs, police vehicles, and public service equipment. In this video, Commsprepper does an excellent job of taking us step-by-step through the process of installing a professional looking NMO mount. Be sure to connect the antenna system to the metal portion of your vehicle, since the car body serves as part of your antenna.  Because many vehicles these days employ fiberglass and other plastic parts in the car body, you may have to establish a crude ground radial system with copper strips below the NMO mount.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blogs sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--N4LQ Multiband Inverted L Antenna. Post #873.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please check insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuD2mBZKHOg. Multiband antennas covering 160 meters to 10 meters tend to be very large, particularly when a quarter wave vertical antenna for the 160 meter band can be as tall as 135 feet/41.15 meters.  You could save some space and still get decent multiband performance by using an inverted L antenna that could fit on your property. In this video, Steve Ellington (N4LQ)  uses a 100 foot/30.48 meters (later upgraded to 200 feet/60.97 meters) long inverted L that covers all amateur radio bands between 160 and 10 meters.  He uses a MFJ-998 antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") to keep SWR in check.  Steve's project may give you some good ideas on building a similar antenna for your property.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How To Build A Delta Loop Antenna. Post #872.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uUVMaRFv4. My favorite amateur radio antenna is the easily-made and efficient delta loop antenna. In this video from Hiram Vazquez (WV2H), we learn the basic theory, construction, and performance parameters of this versatile HF antenna. Delta Loops display modest gain, have low noise, take up little room, and are inexpensive to build.  At my QTH, I have a delta loop similar to Hiram's.  The antenna's total length is 142-feet/43.29 meters and is attached to the top of a 33-ft/10.06 meters telescoping fiberglass pole.  The bottom portion of the delta loop is supported by two 10-ft/10.06 meters bamboo poles. The antenna is fed by a length of 450 ohm ladder line running into a 4:1 current balun. A short length of RG-8X coaxial cable connects the balun to my trusty Drake MN-4 antenna transmatch.  A small piece of RG-8X coax connects the "tuner" to my Swan 100 MXA HF transceiver.  My delta loop covers 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters with no difficulty.  Hopefully, Hiram's tutorial will give you some ideas on how to build your own delta loop antenna.  This is a great HF antenna!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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