Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Rat Tails and Counterpoise adapters for VHF Rubber Duck Antennas. Post #1283.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-JqK7w_1d8.

Are you disappointed in the performance of the stock "rubber duck" antenna that came as standard equipment on your HT?  You're not alone.  The "rubber duck" antenna is sometimes no better than a "dummy load", especially if you're trying to hit a distant repeater.

In this video from "Mountain Parameters", we learn about a quick and easy antenna attachment that will help improve the efficiency and range of your "rubber duck" HT antenna.  A simple, effective, and inexpensive improvement that can be made for any HT antenna is the creation of a "counterpoise" made from cheap, locally available components. This homemade "counterpoise" creates a virtual ground plane, by adding the "missing half" to your HT's antenna. This simple device is often called a "Rat Tail."  This wire attachment to the base of your HT's antenna will improve the efficiency of the antenna and permit better connections to repeaters or simplex stations.  If you enjoy hiking or camping, be sure to pack one of these "counterpoise" wires in your "go kit."  This simple attachment may make the difference between having a contact or losing one.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, October 16, 2017

Ham Radio - Super cheap antenna insulators. Post #1282.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrrJxWK0NNM.

You'd be amazed at the materials you can use for your antenna projects.  For example, take the case of antenna insulators.  While you can buy profession ceramic insulators on line, why not build them yourself with materials found in your home or at the nearest building supply/hardware store?  In this video, Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW) used something called "Campbell Plastic Clips" for his antenna insulators.  They seem to work well and stand up to varying weather conditions.  I've used electric fence egg insulators, pvc pipe, and even thick rubber bands for my homemade antenna insulators.  Be creative and see what you can find for your next antenna project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Making and Using a Simple 40-m Dipole (#86)> Post #1281.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfLUrVnnQUI.

Here's another great video tutorial from David Casler (KE0OG).  In this video, Dave shows how simple materials around your home can be used to make an effective 40-meter dipole antenna.  If you had to buy the materials at a neighborhood home improvement outlet or hardware store, your total cost would be less than $30.00.  I've built several dipole antennas following Dave's instructions, and each one has worked well, considering the cost. If you use coaxial cable as a feedline, your 40-meter antenna can be used on the third harmonic for 15-meter operation. If you use a balanced feeder, along with a 4:1 current balun and an antenna "tuner", you can have multiband capability from 40 meters through 10 meters.  This simple antenna will serve you well.  Erect it as high as you can.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Balanced 450 Ohm ladder Feedline Though Interior Walls, Foundation, and ...


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv0nsRTSoiw. This is post #1280 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

Although I prefer balanced feedlines for my homebrewed antennas, they sometimes prove difficult to install because of limitations imposed by your home's or apartment's structure.  In this respect, coaxial cable feedlines have a definite advantage.  In this video from KJ4KAF, we see how a little creativity can overcome some of installation challenges presented by balanced feedlines. Generally, balanced feedlines such as 450 ohm ladder line, 300 ohm television twin lead, and homemade 600 ohm feedline show lower losses than coaxial cables. Balanced feedlines, along with a sturdy antenna transmatch ("tuner") and a 4:1 current balun will allow multiband use from a single HF dipole antenna.  Hopefully, this video will give some suggestions on how to use a balanced feedline in your shack.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
htps://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for visiting us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, October 13, 2017

HAM RADIO RV MOTORHOME BUG OUT BOONDOCK. Post #1279.


If you can't view the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIpmSObR0M.

Whenever you go on holiday or vacation, be sure to take amateur radio with you, especially if you plan to travel self-contained in a RV motorhome.  This excellently produced tutorial shows some of the rigs, antennas, and equipment that can be incorporated into a motorhome.  Amateur Radio is a great asset during a "bugout" or "boondock", where local cell phone, TV, or FM radio are not available.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).