Saturday, February 17, 2018

HF Field Ops Gear-up. Dipole Antenna Tuning. Post #1406.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgdP8ao71Cc. You should also get the author's script and a list of NVIS technical references.

This exceptionally well-done video from "GUERRILLACOMM" shows you how to design, build, tune, and operate a NVIS (Near Vertical Incident Skyway) antenna for portable or emergency use.

According to the author, this low-lying NVIS dipole antenna is designed for 7 MHz (40 meter amateur radio band) and will cover local, state, and regional areas near your home.  It's always a good practice to test your portable antennas before you go to the field so you can make adjustments without stress or strain.

Reaction to the video has been favorable, with suggestions ranging from wire trimming to best height above ground for efficient operations.

Carl (N6CKV) suggests "Rather than cutting the wire to tune your antenna, try to fold the excess length back onto the antenna so if you make it too short you can easily lengthen it..."

And long time QRP enthusiast, Julian (OH8STN), recommends the height of the 40 meter NVIS antenna to be around 10-13 feet (3.04-3.96 meters) above ground.

NVIS antennas are well-suited for local and regional communications.  You can get more information on this type of antenna by "googling" NVIS Antennas.

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For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, February 16, 2018

Jeri Ellsworth, AI6TK, and Amy Herndon, AI6ZU, at Quartzfest 2018 Part 2. Post #1405.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=RXGp6TBBMFQ.

This video from Randy Hall (K7AGE) is part 2 of an extended interview with Jeri Ellsworth (AI6TK) and Amy Herndon (AI6ZU) during the couple's visit to Quartzfest 2018 in Arizona.

In this video, Randy, Jeri, and Amy go outside the RV (recreational vehicle) to examine the antenna system for their vehicle.  Some of the ideas discussed in this post could be helpful for radio amateurs who operate under severed restrictions, such as HOAs and CC&Rs.  Overall, an excellent interview with some fascinating rig and antenna ideas.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these web sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

The views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Jeri Ellsworth, AI6TK, and Amy Herndon, AI6ZU, at Quartzfest 2018 Part 1. Post #1404.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7-ttbOaLvM&t=78s.

A fascinating and educational video tutorial on how to create a portable amateur radio station for a RV (recreational vehicle).  Randy Hall (K7AGE) dropped by the 2018 Quartzfest in Arizona to interview Jeri Ellsworth (AI6TK) and Amy Herndon (AI6ZU) as they prepared to operate at this annual festival for RV owners.  It's interesting to note how Jeri and Amy worked around grounding and antenna problems to get their mobile station on the air.  Some of the suggestions discussed in this video could be useful for radio amateurs operating in deed-restricted properties (HOAs/CC&Rs).

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM(.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

KL7 5 Band Pipe Vertical 20-17-15-12-10 meter vertical. Post #1403.


KL7 5 Band Pipe Vertical 20-17-15-12-10 meter vertical

(http://www.hamuniverse.com/kl7jr5bandvertical.html).

Accessed on 15 February 2018, 0025 UTC, Post #1403.

Author:  John Reisenauer, Jr. (KL7JR).

Please enter post title in your browser search box to read the full article.

Comment:

Here's an interesting antenna project from John Reisenauer, Jr. (KL7JR) that could help those with limited space for a full dipole antenna.  John has provided an excellent diagram, materials list, construction notes, and photographs to help you build your own 5 band vertical antenna.  With a good antenna "tuner", low loss coaxial feed line, and a simple ground radial system, you could be on the air with a decent signal in a few hours.

Most of the materials for this multiband vertical antenna can be found at the nearest building supply outlet or neighborhood hardware store.

Here is a basic diagram of the antenna and the required material to get you started.  Please insert the post title into your browser to see the diagram.

Material List:
1 ea 10 foot 3/4 inch EMT conduit
1 ea 10 foot 1/2 inch EMT conduit
1 ea 102 inch CB whip
3 each hose clamps
Assorted bolts, nuts from junk box
Insulating support for base of antenna (3 inch)
Assorted # 12 wire or plumbers tape for radial ring
4 to 6 or more radials  + - 16 feet long from wire for each radial
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For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

6 Meter EDZ Signal Squirter. Post #1402.


6 Meter Signal Squirter
(http://www.hamuniverse.com/6meteredz.html).

Reporter:  N4UJW.

Accessed on 14 Februrary 2018, 0400 UTC.

Please click link to read the full article. If the link is down, please enter the post title into you browser search box.

Here's a quick, easy, inexpensive 6 meter Extended Double Zepp antenna that will add approximately 3dB to your signal from its broadside bi-directional pattern when installed about a half wavelength above ground.

Most of the materials for this  "super dipole" antenna can be found at the nearest building supply or hardware store in your area. N4UJW recommends #14 AWG stranded copper wire for the antenna elements and a balanced feedline, such as 300 ohm television twin lead, 450 ohm ladder line, and even regular lamp cord.  A balance antenna "tuner" or a tuner/balun combination will be need to connect the EDZ to your 6 meter transceiver.

N4UJW offers this drawing and suggestions to make your antenna perform as it was designed:

"Below is a "crude" drawing of the antenna design....the pattern will be looking at you and away from you as with any standard dipole."



"You should end up with the approximate lengths shown in the picture drawing..."


"Solder the connections at the center insulator and seal well with electrical tape and some kind of sealer appropriate for outdoor use. (you want to make the connections water tight if possible)."

"Attach the ends of the downlead to the "balanced" terminals of your tuner,
fire up your 6 meter rig on 50.200mhz AM, using just enough power to check swr per normal procedures and trim antenna as needed for lowest swr as with any antenna project."
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For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).