Sunday, May 31, 2015

Morse Code And Amateur Radio Still going Strong Documentary And History. Post #449.

Well-done documentary and brief history of the Morse Code and why our oldest digital mode is growing in popularity in the Amateur Radio Community. There's also a nice shot of John Lyon's (K4CNV) amateur radio station in this video. Although I learned enough enough code to pass my novice license back in 1977, I never really used CW extensively until I became an Amateur Extra Class licensee back in 2005. When I retired from the broadcast business and became a substitute teacher, I had plenty of time to sharpen those dulled CW skills. Besides, much of the world's best DX lies hidden in the lower 25 kHz of the ham bands--places reserved for Extra Class license holders. I found CW a great break from the rigors of the day and enjoyed the conversational contacts with my fellow CW enthusiasts. Lately, I've been hanging out in the old novice/technician parts of the ham bands, talking with newly licensed amateur radio operators. Perhaps, I've developed an appreciation of the mode that forms the basis of amateur radio hobby. Although I have a modern keyer, I prefer to use my old J-38 key, something I acquired from my elmer (mentor) back in the novice/technician days. I guess I'm just a bit too sentimental for my own good. For me, CW is a way to connect to my ham radio past and to the mode that launched the best hobby in the world. Enjoy John's video. Perhaps, you will find CW more attractive than you think. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Portable HF Ham Radio Antenna. Post #448


If you have trouble viewing this video, please enter this URL into your browser: http://youtu.be/642N0oWgY5I. A nice, simple tutorial from W0ZF on how to make an inexpensive portable vertical antenna for the 20 meter Amateur Radio Band. I've made a few of these antennas using a fiberglass telescoping mast, some #18 AWG speaker wire, a few insulators, a simple ground radial systems, an appropriate length of RG-8X coaxial cable as feed line, and an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") to keep the SWR to a low level. If you wish multiband use of this 20 meter vertical antenna, you can feed the antenna with balanced line (450-ohm window line or 300 ohm tv twinlead). The balanced line would go into a 4:1 balun and then onto your antenna transmatch using a short length of RG-8X coaxial cable. This simple antenna works. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, May 29, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Antenna-Theory.com presents: Reflector Antennas - The Satellite Dish. Post #447.


A comprehensive, well-organized video tutorial on the popular reflector antenna used in satellite dishes. The video from "Pete's Free Information Center" describes the basic physics and theory involved in this type of commercial and amateur radio antenna. The video discusses aperture efficiency, gain estimates, and a little bit about satellite dish design, along with geometric optics approximations used in the analysis of these reflector antennas. A useful reference for those into EME or amateur satellite operations. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Ham Radio hiking gear. Post #446.


With the approach of summer and the longer days and warmer temperatures that the season brings, many amateur radio operators will be taking portable stations to the field, local parks, and even along hiking trails to enjoy their hobby in the great outdoors. Often times, many of us go off into the "wilderness" with equipment that is a bit too heavy, needs too much power, and requires sophisticated antennas. If you have to carry a lot of weight in addition to your day pack, your pleasant hike may turn into a chore. Dennis Blanchard (K1YPP) recommends going the low-power route (QRP), with a light rig (Elecraft KX-1, Yaesu-817, or even a homebrew cw rig built into an Altoids mint can), and a few light weight dipoles you can string from a tree or other tall structure. Power can be provided by a set of alkaline batteries or a gel-cell battery. In this well-made video tutorial, Dennis reviews what has been historically popular and shows us what he has found to be a workable, easy to carry solution for portable operations in the field. Have fun! For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Vertical Antenna for DX. Post #445.


If you have trouble viewing this video, please enter this URL into your browser: http://youtu.be/aOizaRd3Qtk. Another excellent antenna tutorial by Stan Gibilisco (W1GV). This time, Stan discusses the theory, construction, and use of a 40 meter vertical antenna for DX. Vertical antennas perform well if they are used in conjunction with a good ground radial system. The radial system supplies the missing half of the vertical element. With a decent radial system, this vertical directs most of its radiation toward the horizon. If you cut the vertical and radial wire lengths for a frequency in the lower portion of the 40 meter band (below 7.100 MHz), the antenna will work very well in the SSB portion of 15 meters as a 3/4 length antenna. This assumes you are feeding the antenna with 50 ohm coaxial cable. If you want multiband use between 40 and 10 meters, feed the antenna with ladder line or tv twinlead. The balanced feeders would then go into a balanced tuner and then on to your transceiver. You could also feed the balanced feeders into a 4:1 balun and then attach the balun to your tuner with a short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable. My current 40 meter vertical is built on the idea advanced by Stan Gibilisco. My ground radial system consists of 16 quarter wavelength radials attached to one leg of some 450 ohm ladder line, with the other leg of the ladder line connected to the vertical element. For now, this antenna serves me well as a general HF antenna. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 25, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How to install a Ham Radio Tilting Crank Up Tower and Mosley Antenna. Post #444.


Excellent tower and antenna installation video from David Mercado (KK4MMD) and his father. It appears David did a good job of preparing the construction site and took the recommending building practices into account before he raised the 40-foot/12.19 meter tower and attached the Mosley TA-53 antenna. Perhaps "it's a stretch" to call this installation "simple" because of the tasks involved. If you decide to erect a tower and antenna, be sure to get some help from people who have installed towers. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM)>

Friday, May 22, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Stealth HF Antenna for your HOA Yes it can be done! - AF5DN. Post #443.


Here's AF5DN's antenna idea for a HOA controlled apartment. Where there's a will, there's a way. Excellent video showing how you can get on the air with a little creativity and a few easily available parts. Be sure to use an antenna transmatch (tuner) and a counterpoise system to reduce RF in the shack. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Tunable Liquid Metal Antennas | American Institute of Physics. Post #442.

Tunable Liquid Metal Antennas | American Institute of Physics: Tunable Liquid Metal Antennas.  Using electrochemistry, North Carolina State University researchers have created a reconfigurable, voltage-controlled liquid metal antenna that may play a huge role in future mobile devices and the coming Internet of Things

From the Journal:Journal of Applied Physics
By AIP News Staff. WASHINGTON D.C., May 19, 2015 -- Researchers have held tremendous interest in liquid metal electronics for many years, but a significant and unfortunate drawback slowing the advance of such devices is that they tend to require external pumps that can't be easily integrated into electronic systems.

So a team of North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers set out to create a reconfigurable liquid metal antenna controlled by voltage only, which they describe in the Journal of Applied Physics, from AIP Publishing.

The team's work was inspired by a phenomenon recently observed during studies of liquid metal by coauthor Professor Michael Dickey's group within the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NCSU. By placing an electrical potential across the interface between the liquid metal and an electrolyte, they found that they could cause the liquid metal to spread by applying a positive voltage—or to contract by applying a negative voltage.

For a bit of background, the shape and length of the conducting paths that form an antenna determine its critical properties such as operating frequency and radiation pattern. "Using a liquid metal—such as eutectic gallium and indium—that can change its shape allows us to modify antenna properties more dramatically than is possible with a fixed conductor," explained Jacob Adams, coauthor and an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NCSU.

How did the team create the tunable antenna controlled by voltage only? By using electrochemical reactions to shorten and elongate a filament of liquid metal and change the antenna's operating frequency. Applying a small positive voltage causes the metal to flow into a capillary, while applying a small negative voltage makes the metal withdraw from the capillary.

The positive voltage "electrochemically deposits an oxide on the surface of the metal that lowers the surface tension, while a negative potential removes the oxide to increase the surface tension," Adams said. These differences in surface tension dictate which direction the metal will flow.

This advance makes it possible to "remove or regenerate enough of the 'oxide skin' with an applied voltage to make the liquid metal flow into or out of the capillary. We call this 'electrochemically controlled capillarity,' which is much like an electrochemical pump for the liquid metal," Adams noted.

Although antenna properties can be reconfigured to some extent by using solid conductors with electronic switches, the liquid metal approach greatly increases the range over which the antenna's operating frequency can be tuned. "Our antenna prototype using liquid metal can tune over a range of at least two times greater than systems using electronic switches," he pointed out.

Myriads of potential applications await within the realm of mobile devices. "Mobile device sizes are continuing to shrink and the burgeoning Internet of Things will likely create an enormous demand for small wireless systems," Adams said. "And as the number of services that a device must be capable of supporting grows, so too will the number of frequency bands over which the antenna and RF front-end must operate. This combination will create a real antenna design challenge for mobile systems because antenna size and operating bandwidth tend to be conflicting tradeoffs."

This is why tunable antennas are highly desirable: they can be miniaturized and adapted to correct for near-field loading problems such as the iPhone 4's well-publicized "death grip" issue of dropped calls when by holding it by the bottom. Liquid metal systems "yield a larger range of tuning than conventional reconfigurable antennas, and the same approach can be applied to other components such as tunable filters," Adams said.

What's next for the researchers? They've already begun exploring the fundamental and applied elements of tunable liquid metals. "There's still much to learn about the behavior of the surface oxides and their effect on the surface tension of the metal," Adams said. "And we're studying ways to further improve the efficiency and speed of reconfiguration."

In the long term, Adams and colleagues hope to gain greater control of the shape of the liquid metal -- not only in one-dimensional capillaries but perhaps even two-dimensional surfaces to obtain nearly any desired antenna shape. "This would enable enormous flexibility in the electromagnetic properties of the antenna and allow a single adaptive antenna to perform many functions," he added.

###

For More Information:
Jason Socrates Bardi
1 240-535-4954
jbardi@aip.org
@jasonbardi

Article title:A reconfigurable liquid metal antenna driven by electrochemically controlled capillarity
Authors: M. Wang, C. Trlica, M.R. Khan, M.D. Dickey and J.J. Adams
Author affiliations: North Carolina State University.



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Comment:



This could be a major breakthrough in solving a variety of antenna issues with smart phones, iPads, tablets, and other digital devices.  According to the research team, liquid metals such as Indium and Gallium could allow manufacturers "to modify antenna properties more dramatically than is possible with a fixed conductor."  If this technology comes to production, it will eliminate the so-called "death grip" issue of dropped calls found in some iPhone 4 models by holding the phone at the bottom.  There are also applications for GPS systems and other digital devices relying on compact and often inefficient antennas.  Liquid metal antennas could also find a home in Amateur Radio where many handheld  VHF transceivers are fairly small.  This research could change the way cell phone and Amateur Radio networks are designed and used.



For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.



Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Homebrew Slinky Ham Radio Antenna. Post #441.


Here's a nice weekend antenna idea from "Tinker John" (W5CYF). John gives us a step by step look at building a low cost (under $10) dipole antenna for 20 and 40 meters using the popular "Slinky" toy from Walmart. Add a few pieces of PVC pipe, some coax connectors, nuts and bolts, and a suitable length of 50 ohm coax and you're almost ready to go. Trim for the best SWR. I've built a few of these antennas and I've found 450 ohm ladder line into a balanced tuner (or into a 4:1 balun and then into an antenna tuner with short piece of RG-8X coax) works very well for this portable antenna. The slinky antenna works best on the higher HF bands (20 through 10 meters). Have fun! For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news, please visit my two news sites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1420289353. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Mobile Radio Antennas, Mounting Options, Performance Tips. Post #440.


Well-produced and clearly explained video tutorial from "Rugged Radios" on mobile radio antennas. The video discusses the right mobile antenna, understanding ground planes, proper mounting locations, mounting options, and basic troubleshooting techniques. A good video to add to your basic Amateur Radio library. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news, please visit my two news sites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  If you have trouble viewing this video, please enter the following URL into your browser:  https;//youtu.be/Fmm63d2Zyv4.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Amateur Extra Class Lesson 9.3, Antenna Systems. Post 439.


Dave Casler wraps up his 3-part series on Antenna Systems with this outstanding video. Although the video tutorial is geared for those taking the Amateur Extra Class License Exam, there's plenty of good, basic antenna information in this program series for the rest of us. In this video, Dave discusses impedance matching of transmission lines to antennas, how transmission lines work, The Smith Chart, transmission line stubs, synchronous transformers, and antenna analyzers. This 3-part antenna series should be part of your Amateur Radio library. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news, please visit my two news blogs: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Part 2 of 2, Amateur Extra Lesson 9.2, Practical Antennas. Post #438.


This is part 2 of Dave Casler's outstanding series of tutorials on Practical Antennas. Although the discussion is aimed at those studying for the Amateur Radio Extra Class License Exam, the material is useful for all licensees. In this well-produced video, Dave looks at Beverage Antennas, Phased Arrays, Satellite Antennas, and Radio Direction Finding (RDF).  Dave offers good, clear, and simple explanations of often difficult to understand Antenna Theory. This video should be part of your Amateur Radio Reference Library. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated frequently. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news, please visit my two news sites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 14, 2015

PART 1 of 2 Amateur Extra Lesson 9.2 Practical Antennas


A very well done, easily understood, and most informative video on practical antennas for the Amateur Radio operator. This is part 1 of 3 segments dealing with antenna theory and design of antennas for ham radio use. Dave Cassler's tutorials are designed to help those preparing for the Amater Extra Class License Exam. These videos are excellent reference material and should be added to your Amateur Radio library. For the lates Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can also find the latest news about the Nepalese earthquake and the role Amateur Radio is playing in rescue and recovery operations. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. You can find more Amateur Radio news at my two other web sites: http://kh6jrm.com and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

New Nepal Earthquake May 12. Post #436.

New Nepal Earthquake May 12: New Nepal Earthquake May 12. Amateur radio emergency nets are reported to have been activated on 14205 kHz and 14215 kHz.   On 9N1EMERGENCY Colin Wilson posted:
Following the announcement this morning of further earthquakes in Nepal we have activated 14205 kHz and our primary frequency for Emergency traffic to and from Nepal. 14215 has been activated also as a secondary frequency, stations wishing to assist should call net control on 215 not 205 thanks.

9N1EMERGENCY Facebook Group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/823876351031939/

On the RAYNET-HF site Greg Mossop G0DUB reports:

At 0705UTC this morning Nepal was hit by a new earthquake of magnitude 7.4. The planned response from the American MARS service with 9N1SP is now in place should support be required. However there is still a large international disaster response structure in the country from the earlier event.

More information when I get it.

73,
Greg, G0DUB
IARU Region 1 Emergency Communications Co-Ordinator
RAYNET-HF http://raynet-hf.net/
Source http://raynet-hf.net/2015/05/12/nepa...thquake-12may/

A Look At The Wonderful Drake 2-C Ham Band Radio Receiver. Post #435.


Like many hams, I have a modest collection of tube gear, including receivers, some test equipment, and a few 1960s-1970s vintage transceivers (Kenwood TS-520 and a Kenwwood TS-520S). Although I've used the classic Drake 2-C receiver during field days and visits to other shacks, I never owned one myself. So, when I found this excellent tutorial on the beautiful Drake 2-C from Larry (WA0AKX--the Radio Ham Guy), I fell in love with this classic receiver all over again. The Drake 2-C, when used in combination with the companion 2NT transmitter (pictured in this video), formed the basis of an excellent novice station during the 1967-1968 time frame. The receiver is simple, well-designed, and easy to use. The quality of most Drake amateur radio equipment is excellent. The Drake Company got out of the amateur radio business many years ago, but is still around as a maker of LNA's for satellite use. One day, I hope to find a Drake 2-C and add it to my collection of classic rigs. Meanwhile, enjoy this tutorial. Larry does an excellent job of demonstating a quality piece of ham gear. For the latest  Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. Thse news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news, please visit my two other web sites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Nepal Earthquake - Update May 9 | Southgate Amateur Radio News. Post #434.

Nepal Earthquake - Update May 9 | Southgate Amateur Radio News: This page is brought to
you in association with  The Southgate Amateur Radio Club News and AMSAT-UK.   Page last updated on: Sunday, May 10, 2015.   This final update was received Saturday from Jayu VU2JAU who has been keeping in daily contact with Satish 9N1AA on 20m.   Their scheduled contacts have decreased in frequency over the last few days and closed at 02:30 UTC today. This is the last known formal international link to stop operating following the ending of MARS communications support at 1100z 05 May 15 between T6TM in Afghanistan and Dr. Panday, 9N1SP.

Aftershocks continue in the area but the frequency of those events has reduced quicker than expected, however there are still vulnerable structures which are being worked on and the terrain means landslides remain a possibility.

There are still Radio Amateurs in the country for example Dale, BA4TB and Mi, BD4TR are part of the Chinese rescue team assisting in the aftermath of the earthquake. Their activity though is in their spare time on the HF bands and is being well advertised through the Dx lists.

Thanks to everyone for their patience and support during the radio amateur activities associated with this disaster. Individual organisations are now commencing their Debriefing process to see what can be done to improve the response next time.

Sources: VU2JAU, ARRL, USGS

Greg Mossop G0DUB
IARU Region 1 Emergency Communications Co-Ordinator
http://iaru-r1.org/

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How to Build: Ham Radio 2 Meter Quarter Wave Antenna. Post #433.


Concise, well-organized tutorial from Randy Hall (K7AGE) on how to build a 2 Meter Quarter Wave Vertical Antenna. This antenna is simple, cheap, and fairly easy to build and maintain. If you're going to mount this antenna outside your radio room, please weather proof all connections. This antenna will really boost the signal of your new HT. Most of the materials can be found at the nearest hardware store or building supply outlet. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated frequently. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. You can also find more amateur radio news at my two other websites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Amateur Radio Repeater from US Clears Customs in Nepal. Post #432.

Amateur Radio Repeater from US Clears Customs in Nepal: Amateur Radio Repeater from US Clears Customs in Nepal.  TAGS: amateur radio, amateur radio community, amateur radio equipment, amateur radio repeater, ARRL Emergency Preparedness, earthquake disaster, ham radio, ham radio equipment, magnitude earthquake, Manager Mike Corey, Military Auxiliary Radio, Nepal, recovery effort
05/07/2015. Thanks to the efforts of the Computer Association of Nepal-USA (CAN-USA), a repeater that the group had donated to Tribhuvan University in Nepal was released from customs on May 5 and now is at the university in the care of Sanjeeb Panday, 9N1SP. CAN-USA Disaster Preparedness Committee Chair Suresh Ojha, W6KTM, said his organization “sought and received help from the US State Department, the US Embassy in Nepal, and Nepal’s Ministry of Information and Communication.”  “We were especially thrilled that the Minister of Information and Communication, the Honorable Minendra Rijal, personally contacted 9N1SP and offered his help on the matter,” Ojha told ARRL. “The very next day the equipment was released from customs. We believe that the collective input from all interested parties had a cumulative effect on the overall process.”

In 2013, anticipating the possibility of an earthquake disaster, CAN-USA — also known as the Global Nepali Professional Network (GNPN) — funded and installed the only Amateur Radio repeater currently in service in Nepal and donated a transmitter that was recently used to transmit slow-scan TV images of earthquake-ravaged areas to a Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) operator in Afghanistan. Ojha said his organization is “thrilled to have another repeater in the nation.”

On May 1, CAN-USA — under its “Radio Mala” project banner — called on the Amateur Radio community to urge the government of Nepal to release additional ham radio equipment being held up in customs, so that it could be used to support the earthquake relief and recovery effort.

CAN-USA said that as Nepal responds to the devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake, Amateur Radio has been playing “a key role in the recovery effort.” Radio Mala had decried “bureaucratic misunderstanding” in Nepal that, it said, was keeping needed Amateur Radio equipment out of the hands of responders.

ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager Mike Corey, KI1U, said the League has been working closely with amateurs in Nepal to identify equipment needed for the relief effort and was preparing to ship equipment from its Ham Aid inventory. “We’re still not able to send anything,” Corey said this week, citing transportation and bureaucratic challenges.

The “Ham Radio Mala” Facebook page includes more information on Amateur Radio’s role in the current earthquake relief and recovery effort.

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Here's the latest update from the ARRL about Amateur Radio's role in providing emergency communications in Nepal following the devastating 7.8 earthquake.  The much-needed repeater will be put to good use by Nepalese hams trying to help in the massive recovery effort.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--N4LQ End Fed Wire Antenna. Post #431.


Here's another antenna idea from Steve Ellington (N4LQ). This time, Steve uses a modified end fed wire antenna, measuring 50 feet (15.24 meters) vertically and 150 feet (45.73 meters) horizontally. This antenna requires a good ground radial system to work properly. These random, end fed wires can be used successfully if an adequate ground is used in conjunction with an antenna tuner (antenna transmatch). For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. For recent news of Amateur Radio activity in Nepal following the devastating 7.8 earthquake, you can visit The Southgate Amateur Radio Club News page or check with the ARRL at http://www.arrl.org. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news, please visit my news sites: http://kh6jrm.net or http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Both of these sites contain updated  information on the Nepal earthquake and the role Amateur Radio is playing in the recovery effort. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How To Build A 10 Meter Dipole. Post #430.


Excellent tutorial from Randy Hall (K7AGE) on how to build a basic dipole for the 10 meter band (28.000-29.999 MHz). Technician Class licensees can use SSB from 28.300 MHz to 28.500 MHz. This simple, easily built antenna will get you on the air quickly. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can find more Amateur Radio news items at my two other blog sites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--What in the world is WSPR? (PART 2). Post #429.


If you have trouble viewing this video, please enter the title link into your browser: https://youtu.be/ZTXCnaSNEY. This is part 2 of "Calgary Toad's" tutorial on WSPR, a weak signal mode designed for the QRP Amateur Radio Community. This mode is becoming popular with hams experimenting in the 630 meter band (472 kHz to 479 kHz). The use of the mode may increase now that the FCC will release segments of the 2200 meter (137 kHz-138 kHz) and 630 meter (472 kHz to 479 kHz) bands for Amateur Radio use in the United States. There will be power and antenna restrictions placed on these bands, so weak signal modes such as WSPR will find an immediate application. I think it's time for me to order a WSPR kit and see what I can find on these two "basement" bands. For a first time effort, these two videos are quite good. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. For more Amateur Radio news and events please visit my other blogs: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 4, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--What in the world is WSPR? (PART 1). Post #428.


Now that the FCC will soon release frequencies in the 2200 and 630 meter bands for Amateur Radio use, interest in these bands is growing, especially among members of the QRP (low-power) community. Because antennas for these bands are so large, hams are resorting to many digital modes to enhance whatever antennas they can create for these bands. For example, a half-wave dipole for 472 kHz to 479 kHz will exceed 991.ft/302.29 meters. This is where weak signal digital modes such as WSPR come in. This simple video from "Calgary Toad" serves as a short tutorial on WSPR or the Weak Signal Network. WSPR, designed for the QRP enthusiast, sends FSK transmissions and lets the operator see instant propagation reports. This video is part 1 of a 2-part series on the WSPR digital mode. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can also get Amateur Radio news in detail from my two news sites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subsription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--A Simple Wire Tuner. Post # 427.


Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) explains the theory and design behind a basic, but effective and efficient, antenna tuner for feeding random wires, especially half-wave, end-fed antennas. You can buy a similar antenna tuner from MFJ and other companies, but why not build your own and have the satisfaction of saving some money and working stations on a tuner you built yourself? It's important to remember that random wire antennas, including end-fed half-wave wires, need a decent ground radial system to work propertly. Even a minimal number of radials (4-8) for the lowest band of choice will get you plenty of contacts. Good luck and have fun with your own homebrewed antenna tuner. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can also find my Amateur Radio news at my news site: http://kh6jrm.net. You can follow our blog community with a free em-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Hello--Welcome to Amateur Radio. Post #426.


An excellent, new video (02 May 2015) from the ARRL which introduces Amateur Radio and encourages people to get a license and get on the air. This video can be used as an introduction to any Amateur Radio License class. The photography is quite good and the narration nicely paced. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are update daily. You can find more Amateur Radio news at my two other websites: http://kh6jrm.net and http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thank you for joining us today! Aloha es 7e de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, May 1, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Terminated Folded Dipole. Post #425.


This antenna from "remingtoncounty100" is a traveling wave or double terminated folded dipole that operates from 1.8 MHz to 54 MHz. The antenna designer claims that the antenna exhibits "a lower noise floor" than a conventional dipole and, in most cases, doesn't require an antenna tuner. I built a similar and somewhat cruder copy of this antenna using some 300 ohm television twin lead I had in the junk box. The elements were made from twin lead as well as the feed line. I ran the feed line into a 4:1 balun and used a piece of RG-8X to connect the balun to my Drake MN-4. The antenna was cut for 40 meters and was able to work 20 meters without difficulty. Some adjustments to the antenna transmatch were needed to get a low SWR on 15 and 10 meters. If you have a spare weekend, you may want to try this much improved design over the rudimentary folded dipole I made on a Saturday morning. If you'd rather buy a commercial version of the double terminated dipole, try the WD-330 made by Diamond Antennas. Folded dipoles are fascinating antennas and will work very well if you design and build them properly. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. You can find more Amateur Radio news at: http://kh6jrm.net; http://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353; and http://www.ham-radio.alltop.com. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM)>