Monday, November 30, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HAM RADIO 2W0DAA Caged Dipole Antennas and Baluns Home Made Photo Slide ...


This is post #613. If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address in your browser search box: https://youtu.be/L0Ek_dOaQGA.  In this beautifully done video, Dave (2W0DAA) shows us some of his outstanding baluns and antennas, including this expertly homebrewed cage dipole.  Some of the older antenna designs, such as the caged dipole, are making their way back into the amateur radio community again.  If you want broadband response in the 160, 80, and 40 meter bands, you may want to try a caged dipole.  Dave shows us how to make one of these classic antennas.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated regularly.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Simple HamRadio Antennas--The Double Bazooka Antenna - A Review. Post #612


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/9xfpcD6xuSo.  This is an updated review of the 40 and 80 meter double bazooka antennas made by IAC Antennas (http://www.iacantennas.com) from Rob Wagner (VK3BVW).  The antenna is a quality product that stands up well to environmental conditions.  Although you can make a double bazooka yourself, you may prefer this commercially tested and guaranteed product from IAC Antennas.  The antenna is a bit heavy, so strong supports are needed to maintain the structural integrity of your antenna installation.  Mount the double bazooka antenna as high as you can get it.  I've seen these antennas during various ARRL Field Day events.  The performance of double bazooka antennas on 80 and 40 meters is impressive.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, November 28, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Burying radials. Post # 611.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this URL into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/za3xQs6wAR0. Nice homemade video by Dominic Smith on how to install a ground radial system for a vertical antenna...in this case the popular Hustler 6-BTV.  The important thing to remember is to install as many radials as you can.  The radial field supplies the missing half of your vertical antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, November 27, 2015

Pulling cables through a long underground pipe. Post #610.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/QX9iwNOPSmI.  In this video, Andy Reynolds shows us a simple way to pull cable through a long underground pipe.  Andy's method involves some simple equipment, including a vacuum cleaner, some strong fishing line, and some plastic bags. This procedure can also be used to pull coaxial cable/feedlines from your outdoor antenna to your shack. Before you attempt this, be sure there are no buried gas or electrical lines in your work area.  It may be a good idea to use black plastic conduit to thread your cables, so utility crews won't mistake it for their own buried lines.  Although Andy used this approach to connect another solar array to his already existing solar power system, the same approach could be used for feeding a remotely located antenna on your property.  Be sure the coax you use is rated for outdoor and underground use.  Good luck! For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, November 26, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Getting around HOA antenna restrictions. Post #609.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/psUdNEfDIc4.  Here's another antenna idea for those of us living in HOA and CC&R communities.  "Supra2424" is using a "stealth" antenna comprised of a LDG S9v31 fiberglass support pole (31-feet/9.45meters), 24 ground radials made from CAT 5 cable, and LMR 400 coaxial cable as the feed line. The antenna is raised upright during operating hours and lowered when activity is over.  Supra2424 says the antenna is painted green, so it blends well into the surrounding vegetation.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Backward Inverted L Antenna. Post #608.


If you have difficulty viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/SOpdXHnzIA. An interesting variant on the familiar Inverted L antennas used for the lower amateur radio HF bands (160 meters, 80 meters, and 40 meters). Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) does a good job of explaining the general theory behind random wires and how to use them for effective HF antennas.  This "backward inverted L antenna" would be useful for amateurs who have their operating station on the second floor or higher in their homes or apartments. I haven't been active on 160 meters because of space limitations, but, with this design, that situation will change.  A few months ago, Dean (KH6B) gave me a pre-assembled 160 meter inverted L antenna to conduct experiments at my new QTH in the Puna District of Hawaii Island.  Unlike my present rental home, this property has one-acre of space to erect a nice antenna "farm."  Thanks to several tall trees and my trusty archery set, I have enough incentive to erect this fairly compact antenna for the "gentlemen's band."  Stan's backward inverted L antenna should be a perfect match, since my amateur station is located in a loft above the main floor of the house.  If this design isn't satisfactory, I can always erect a conventional inverted L antenna and relocate my station to the garage storage room at ground level.  Stan's backward inverted L may help you get on 160 meters with a decent signal.  It's worth a try.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Happy Thanksgiving to all!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--40 Meter 30 ft. Vertical--Home Brew Antenna. Post #607.


If you're having difficulty in viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/ztwLdIm6wsM.  A simple, easy to understand tutorial on how to design, build, and use a 40 meter vertical antenna.  Jack Demaree made this video after deciding to repair and rebuild his original 40 meter vertical (the one in the video) after several years of use.  Jack used locally available materials, including a short length of schedule 40 PVC pipe, an aluminum plate, a 30 ft./9.14 meters length of 3 inch/7.62 cm diameter irrigation pipe, 60 quarter wave radials, a top hat consisting of three, 18 inch/45.72 cm rods, and a 50 ohm coaxial cable feedline.  With careful trimming, Jack didn't need an antenna transmatch ("tuner") to cover the 40 meter amateur radio band. This simple 40 meter vertical antenna will also work on the 15 meter amateur radio band, using the 3rd harmonic of 40 meters.  An antenna transmatch would be helpful for this band, since SWR would be higher than on the 40 meter band.  Jack says the antenna has a SWR of 1:1 for the 40 meter band.  If you wanted coverage from 40 through 10 meters, you could feed the antenna with 300 ohm television twin lead or 450 ohm ladder line. The feedline would then go into a 4:1 balun and then on to the antenna transmatch via a short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable.  This antenna would make an excellent weekend project and wouldn't cost much money.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, November 23, 2015

Antarctic and Subantarctic expedition videos | Southgate Amateur Radio News. Post #606.

Antarctic and Subantarctic expedition videos | Southgate Amateur Radio News: This page is brought to
you in association with The Southgate Amateur Radio Club (UK).
(http://www.southgatearc.com/news/2015/november/antarctic_and_subantarctic_expedition_videos.htm).
Accessed on 24 November 2015, 04:26 hrs, UTC.



Page last updated on: Sunday, November 22, 2015
Antarctic and Subantarctic expedition videos.

Mehdi, F5PFP, has put together a great list of Antarctic and Subantarctic expeditions videos available on the Web.

Check them out:
3Y0PI : Cape Eva Camp - Peter I Island
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYRy94cFK4M

FB8AX : Port Martin - Antarctica
(From 3minutes 50 seconds to 26mn 50s in french language)
http://www.canalu.mobi/video/cerimes/antarctique.9055

FT5XO : Port Jeanne d'Arc - Big Island of Kerguelen
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXJgL8ukIuA

FT5YJ: Port Charcot - Wandel Island, Antarctica
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poMxAnKhzwM

LU/FT5YJ : Almirante Brown - Antarctica
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPQYa25hC20

VK0IR : ANARE Station - Heard Island
https://vimeo.com/121445124

VP8DLM: Base O -Danco Island Antarctica
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ONE3psnJG4

VP8GEO: Husvik Whaling Station - Big island of South Georgia
https://vimeo.com/121317595

VP8ORK: Waterpipe Refuge - Signy Island, South Orkney
https://vimeo.com/121222178

VP8SSI : Corbeta Uruguay Station & Teniente Esquivel Refuge - South
Sandwich Islands
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5B2oo9-Sjw

VP8THU: Corbeta Uruguay - South Sandwich Islands
https://vimeo.com/121317593

ZL9CI : Campbell Island Station
https://vimeo.com/121857792

OPDX

-------------------------------------------------
Comment:
If you've ever wanted to go on a dangerous, yet fulfilling DXpedition, but couldn't afford the cost, then these expertly produced videos of recent Antarctic and Subantarctic DXpeditions will make you feel part of the expedition team.  I can't believe how severe the weather was in most of these isolated, forbidden islands where freezing rain, snow, and howling winds are the norm.  My heart goes out to those brave enough to enter these frozen worlds and provide us with signals from the ends of the Earth.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HF Long Wire Antenna Codan 403. Post #605.

HF Long Wire Antenna Codan 403
(http://www.hf-ssb-transceiver.at-communication.com/en/codan/hf_ssb_antennas_c403.html).
Accessed on 23 November 2015, 04:33 hrs, UTC.

During my "career" as an amateur radio operator (since 1977), I've built a variety of antennas, including HF "longwires" designed to fit my property line and my portable operating requirements. Although these antennas are fun to make, they do take a lot of time to design and build properly, especially the winding and overall construction of the balun (usually 9:1).  The installation of a good ground radial or counterpoise system is important, too.  This type of antenna also requires an antenna transmatch ("tuner") to operate on amateur radio bands from 80 to 10 meters.  If you'd rather have a professionally built HF Long Wire Antenna that covers 2 to 30 MHz, you can't go wrong with antenna products from Codan--a manufacturer of mil-spec manpack transceivers and antennas.

Codan equipment, including their antenna systems, is well-made and can stand up to weather extremes.  This antenna will last for years and is worth the purchase price.

So, if you are reluctant to "roll your own" antenna, you may want to investigate the antenna line marketed by Codan.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Doublet aerial for HF amateur ham radio short wave bands. Post #604.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this URL into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/8ZmyvtMvEGY. Excellent antenna tutorial from Ray (G4NSJ).  In this video, Ray shows us how to design, build, and erect a simple doublet antenna that will cover amateur radio and shortwave bands between 40 and 10 meters.  The key to the success of this basic antenna is the use of open feeders such as 300 ohm television twin lead or 450 ohm ladder line to feed a dipole made up of equal lengths of wire. The ladder line achieves a better antenna element balance than coax-fed antennas and severely limits common mode currents found on coax-fed installations.  Just attach the balanced feeders to a balanced ATU (antenna tuning unit), adjust your "tuner" for the lowest SWR, and begin operating.  Over the past few years, I've learned to love balanced feed lines, since they can turn basic dipoles into multiband antennas.  My backup antenna at home is a 40 meter inverted Vee dipole fed with 450 ohm ladder line.  The antenna works very well and can be broken down easily for portable or emergency use.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, November 20, 2015

Ultra portable antenna tower for ham radio, cellular, camera etc. Post #603.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please enter this URL into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/mtIFMNd9RnA. This is an interesting portable amateur radio tower made from stainless steel.  According to Scott Whitney, the tower is light, portable, and about 34 feet/10.36 meters long.  The tower is collapsible and can be stored in your garage or vehicle for emergency or portable use. You may need a friend to help raise this tower, given its height.  Raising the tower with a beam antenna and rotor attached may present a few problems as well.  Nonetheless, this tower is a nice piece of engineering and appears to be well-made.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Don's 2 meter Extreme Dream Beam Antenna. Post #602.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/ANskuHor7zs. An excellent tutorial from Don, "ThePressMan", on how to build the "ultimate" 2 meter ham radio beam antenna with local parts.  Don claims this multi-element 2 meter beam delivers 12.5 dB gain over a dipole.  The video shows how to build this beam and what parts you will need.  Don also shows you how to use antenna analyzer data to improve performance and lower swr.  A nice weekend project.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Amateur radio homemade antenna mast. Post #601.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/HiADqGDB)Zk. Here's a simple homemade mast for the VHF/UHF amateur radio enthusiast. "MrFarallon" shows how to build and erect this antenna mast using common materials such as aluminum tubing and pine wood boards. The mast is a "tip up/down" antenna support. The antenna is a Comet GP-15-Tri-bander covering 6 meters, 2 meters, and 70 cm. The antenna is fed with 75 feet/22.86 meters of low-loss LMR-400 coaxial cable.  If you choose to build this antenna mast, it would be a good idea to get some help in erecting and guying the mast.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription of by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Attic Fan Dipole on 20/40 meters. Post #600.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/G9mmLyFh7eY. A nice, well-produced video from Patrick Hock showing us how to build a 20/40 meter fan dipole suitable for those living in HOA and CC&R areas.  The antenna is erected in the attic, which makes it invisible to neighbors.  Be sure that you don't have metal shingles on your roof.  An antenna analyzer from either MFJ or Comet (more expensive than the MFJ) and a "dummy load" will help you adjust your antenna without putting a signal on the air.  This would make an excellent weekend project for those in deed-restricted homes or apartments.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).