Thursday, December 31, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Phased Vertical Antennas. Post #644.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/QvgwLoc-w.  Here's a simple way to make your vertical antenna gain more performance and directivity.  Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) explains the theory, design, and performance of phased 1/4 vertical antennas.  In this system, there are two 1/4 wavelength verticals, 1/2 wavelength apart.  Stan explains a basic phasing network that will give your verticals some gain (around 3dB over a monopole) and directivity broadside to the array.  A phased 20, 15, or 10 meter vertical array is easy to make and will give you a better chance to snag that elusive DX.  For more information, visit http://www.sciencewriter.net.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  May you have a happy and prosperous New Year!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Amateur Radio: A Hobby for the 21st Century. Post #643.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxwO14cqyww.  This excellent video from the Radio Society of Great Britain and TX Factor was uploaded by KB8UUZ.  The intent of this video is to introduce Amateur Radio to young people.  The video does a good job of explaining what Amateur Radio is, its mission in society, and how it can further a person's educational and vocational goals.  Very well done.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--$4.00 Ham Radio Satellite Antenna. Post #642.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy_XwvMnIro.  In this excellently produced video, Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ) shows us an easily-made yagi antenna covering the amateur radio 2 m/70 cm bands.  You can use this antenna with your dual band HT to work the SO-50 and other FM amateur radio satellites.  Most of the materials can be found at the nearest hardware or building supply outlet. The antenna elements can be made from metal clothes hangers, steel rods, or even sections of steel measuring tape.  A wooden dowel or even lightweight PVC pipe can be used to support the antenna elements.  Your feed line can be 50 ohm coaxial cable such as RG-58/RG-8X.  Seventy-five (75) ohm coax such as RG-6 can be used as well. Good luck.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, December 28, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--10 Ultra Stealth Antenna Designs For HOAs. Post #640.

10 Ultra Stealth Antenna Designs for HOAs
(http://www.forums.qrz.com/index.php?threads/10-ultra-stealth-antenna-designs-for-hams-260566/).
Accessed on 28 December 2015, 23:46 hrs, UTC.
Author:  KC8VWM.

I ran across this article while I was searching for stealth antenna ideas.  This list of super hidden antennas may be useful for those radio amateurs operating in deed-restricted homes or apartments (HOAs/CC&Rs).

Here's the list:

Solar-powered light pole antenna.
Disguised Portable AM/FM radio dipole.
Purple Martin birdhouse antenna.
Fishing rod prop antenna.
The tire swing vertical antenna.
The badminton net antenna.
The bicycle prop antenna.
The patio umbrella antenna.

Perhaps one of these antennas can help you get on the air.  Good luck!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.
Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HDV 0034 Stealth Amateur Radio Apt. Post #640.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/AVJS_-6k7CQ.  This video from Charlie (KD8EFQ) should appeal to radio amateurs living in deed-restricted apartments or houses (HOAs/CC&Rs).  Charlie has assembled a working amateur radio station capable of covering amateur radio  HF and VHF bands with only a minimal outlay for cost and materials.  He uses mag mount mobile antennas for his VHF work and antenna parts found on eBay for the HF antenna.  Hopefully, Charlie's efforts will inspire other apartment-bound amateur radio operators to experiment and get on the air.  Afterall, a compromise antenna is better than no antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, December 26, 2015

Rapid Antenna Deployment System for Amateur Radio EmComm. Post #639.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/53bHi4_GJFk.  In this video, "Indianacaver" reviews the RADS 9-11/A1 rapid deployment antenna system. The antenna system covers amateur radio frequencies in the HF, VHF, and UHF bands.  Although this system is no longer made, it will give you ideas for making your own portable or emergency antenna kit. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, December 25, 2015

New Ham Shack Part 2. Post #638.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this addess into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/qRpMZnUnAUc.  This is part 2 of Randy Hall's (K7AGE) new ham shack project.  Randy recently moved to the Oregon coast and has been busy rebuilding his radio room.  In part 1, Randy described how he rebuilt his shelves, positioned his equipment, and took care of the electrical and grounding issues in his new shack. In this video, Randy completes his radio room and erects a Par End-Fed Quad Band antenna to finish the process. He used a MFJ-269 antenna analyzer to check out the performance of his new antenna.  A very nice video that can give you some ideas about rearranging your own ham shack.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, December 24, 2015

A Ham Radio Operator's Night Before Christmas. Post #637.

A Ham Radio Operator's Night Before Christmas: A Ham Radio Operator's Night Before Christmas

from Gary Pearce, KN4AQ on December 24, 2015
View comments about this article!
A Ham Radio Operator's Night Before Christmas
T'was the night before Christmas,
And all through two-meters,
Not a signal was keying up
Any repeaters.

The antennas reached up
From the tower, quite high,
To catch the weak signals
That bounced from the sky.

The children, Tech-Pluses,
Took their HTs to bed,
And dreamed of the day
They'd be Extras, instead.

Mom put on her headphones,
I plugged in the key,
And we tuned 40 meters
For that rare ZK3.

When the meter was pegged
by a signal with power.
It smoked a small diode,
and, I swear, shook the tower.

Mom yanked off her phones,
And with all she could muster
Logged a spot of the signal
On the DX Packet Cluster,

While I ran to the window
And peered up at the sky,
To see what could generate
RF that high.

It was way in the distance,
But the moon made it gleam -
A flying sleigh, with an
Eight element beam,

And a little old driver
who looked slightly mean.
So I though for a moment,
That it might be Wayne Green.

But no, it was Santa
The Santa of Hams.
On a mission, this Christmas
To clean up the bands.

He circled the tower,
Then stopped in his track,
And he slid down the coax
Right into the shack.

While Mom and I hid
Behind stacks of CQ,
This Santa of hamming
Knew just what to do.

He cleared off the shack desk
Of paper and parts,
And filled out all my late QSLs
For a start.

He ran copper braid,
Took a steel rod and pounded
It into the earth, till
The station was grounded.

He tightened loose fittings,
Re-soldered connections,
Cranked down modulation,
Installed lightning protection.

He neutralized tubes
In my linear amp...

(Never worked right before --
Now it works like a champ).

A new, low-pass filter
Cleaned up the TV,
He corrected the settings
In my TNC.

He repaired the computer
That would not compute,
And he backed up the hard drive
And got it to boot.

Then, he reached really deep
In the bag that he brought,
And he pulled out a big box,
"A new rig?" I thought!

"A new Kenwood? An Icom?
A Yaesu, for me?!"
(If he thought I'd been bad
it might be QRP!)

Yes! The Ultimate Station!
How could I deserve this?
Could it be all those hours
that I worked Public Service?

He hooked it all up
And in record time, quickly
Worked 100 countries,
All down on 160.

I should have been happy,
It was my call he sent,
But the cards and the postage
Will cost two month's rent!

He made final adjustments,
And left a card by the key:
"To Gary, from Santa Claus.
Seventy-Three."

Then he grabbed his HT,
Looked me straight in the eye,
Punched a code on the pad,
And was gone - no good bye.

I ran back to the station,
And the pile-up was big,
But a card from St. Nick
Would be worth my new rig.
Oh, too late, for his final
came over the air.
It was copied all over.
It was heard everywhere.

The Ham's Santa exclaimed
What a ham might expect,
"Merry Christmas to all,
And to all, good DX."

Source:  http://eham.net/articles/35837, dated 24 December 2015.

1996 Gary Pearce, KN4AQ
Permission granted for any print or electronic reproduction.

Member Comments:

Add A Comment

A Ham Radio Operator's Night Before Christmas Reply
by WG7D on December 24, 2015 Mail this to a friend!
That is great!
Merry Christmas!
From Mike WG7D

RE: A Ham Radio Operator's Night Before Christmas Reply
by SWMAN on December 24, 2015 Mail this to a friend!
That's Cute ! Merry Christmas to you and family !
----------------------------------------
Comment:

A cleverly done adaptation of the classic Clement Moore poem.  I got a chuckle out of this...we surely need some humor at this time of year.  Merry Christmas to all!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--2 Meter Window Apartment Antenna. Post #636.


If you're have trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/2bMNm57YUbA. Like many radio amateurs living in deed-restricted apartments and homes (HOAs/CC&Rs), Daniel Devine faced serious issues getting a 2 meter antenna erected in his apartment. In this video, Daniel created this somewhat unusual design for his 2 meter activity.  Daniel says any kind of outdoor antenna was prohibited in his apartment complex, so he came up with this unconventional design.  Daniel says this homebrew antenna works and he is able to once again enjoy 2 meter contacts with local radio amateurs.  Perhaps, you can improve Daniel's design and, thereby, find a way to get back on the air.  Even a compromise antenna is better than no antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Magnetic loop antenna Dx Contacts Helical Loop Antenna


This is Post # 635. If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please put this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/bNOuzdH2btk. Here's another simple antenna for radio amateurs living in deed-restricted homes and apartments (HOAs and CC&Rs).  In this excellent, well-paced tutorial, Richard Fusinski (K8NDS) shows us how to design, build, and use a helically loaded magnetic loop antenna. Richard shows us two of his designs:  one built for the 20-10 meter amateur radio bands and another for the 80-20 meter amateur radio bands.  These antennas are ideal for antenna-restricted areas or for portable/emergency use.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, December 21, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Alpha EZ Military Antenna The Solution To Your HOA Problems 3-14-2015


This is Post # 634. If you are having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/uJR4HrfArNQ. Here is another way to get on the air from a deed-restricted (HOA/CC&R) property.  "Videosbymike" takes us through the process of erecting an Alpha EZ Military Antenna so as to conform with the HOA/CC&Rs of his home.  This antenna may not apply to your situation, but it should give you some ideas.  Even if this antenna doesn't fit your specific requirements, it will serve as an excellent portable or emergency antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, December 20, 2015

#37: Use a scope to measure the length and impedance of coax. Post #633.


If you're experiencing difficulty in viewing this video, please enter this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/Il_eju4D_TM.  Exceptionally well-produced tutorial from W2AEW on how to use a scope and function generator to measure the length of coaxial transmission line as well as estimate its impedance.  The procedure uses a "poor man's TDR" type of measurement "by launching a pulse into the coax and measuring how long it takes to return after being reflected by the open circuit end."  W2AEW briefly discusses transmission line and reflection theory.  The video is well-paced and easy to follow.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, December 19, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--100 watt 7 MHz magnetic loop for units and apartments> Post #632.


If you're having troble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/ CU_RnLpZ9gw. Here's another antenna idea for those operating in deed restricted areas, such as HOAs and CC&Rs.  In this video, Peter (VK3YE) shows us how to make a 100 watt, 7 MHz magnetic loop antenna suitable for both home and portable operation. According to Peter, "There are no hard to get parts or complex workshop skills required to build this antenna.  Instead of an expensive vacuum variable capacitor, the antenna is brought into resonance with a length of RG-213 coax (approximately 1.85 meters/6.06-feet) for a 3 m/9.84-feet circumference 7 MHz loop."  Peter adds that "The sliding capacitor can be approximately 6 X 8 cm/2.36 X 3.14 inches." Be careful where you mount this antenna, because hazardous voltages can occur on the capacitor during transmit.  Peter says he has good results with this small, portable magnetic loop antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, December 18, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Simple Loop Antenna for 20-10 meters. Post #631.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/y3-LIQ6G6e4.  Here's a very simple loop antenna that will cover the amateur radio 20-10 meter bands.  Lynn (NG9D) has done an excellent job of describing the antenna and the procedure needed to lift it into place.  Loops are fairly forgiving antennas and can deliver a theorectical 2dB gain over a dipole at the same frequency.  Loops are quiet and can be either horizontally or vertically polarized to meet your DX needs. You can also feed this loop antenna with television twin lead or 450 ohm cable.  You'll need a balanced tuner or a 4:1 balun/tuner combination to complete the project. Either way, this loop is easy to make and can serve as an excellent portable or emergency antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Homebrew Slinky Ham Radio Antenna. Post #630.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/Jo0QB83tdkQ.  Here's an interesting antenna design for those of us who like to experiment with unconventional antennas. Tinker John (W5CYF) introduces us to the Slinky Antenna in a clear step-by-step process that's easy to follow. I've found feeding the Slinky with television twin lead or 450 ohm ladder line into a 4:1 balun and then into your antenna transmatch with a short piece of RG-8X coaxial cable will enable you to get multiband coverage from 40 to 10 meters.  I've built a few of these Slinky Antennas for 20 meters and for general SWL activities with my old Hallicrafters SX-62A receiver.  Given its limitations, the Slinky Antenna works fairly well. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Homebrew 10/20/40m EFHW vertical Antenna "SOTA". Post #629.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/29CA_IPyg9M.  In this video, 2E0VOV shows us how easy it is to design and build a vertical half wave antenna covering the 10, 20, and 40 meter amateur radio bands.  This antenna closely resembles the popular "Par End fedz" QRP multiband antenna.  The only thing I would add to this otherwise excellent presentation, is a quarter wave counterpoise wire for each band of use. These wires could be attached to the ground lug of the antenna transmatch ("tuner") or at the base of the antenna mast.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog communit with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Trap Dipole Antennas. Post #628.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser's search box: https//youtu.be/YIS64xHIoq0.  Nicely done video from Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) on the theory and design of a trap half-wave dipole antenna covering the 40, 20, 15, and 10 meter amateur radio bands. The video contains technical and construction tips that will have this simple antenna up and running in a short time.  This antenna is perfect for areas with limited space.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, December 14, 2015

New Home Brew Ladder Line Project at N4LQ. Post #627.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please enter this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/c1Ays78mwZA.  If you feel adventurous and want to build your own ladder line for your multiband dipole, check out this video from Steve Ellington (N4LQ).  For the antenna feed line, Steve used 41.5-ft/12.65 meters of 12-gauge "Flexweave" from The Wireman.  The acrylic forms to support his twin feeders came from USplatic in Lima, Ohio (http:www.usplastic/catalog/item.aspx?sku=440019).  His antenna is a flat top dipole, measuring 128-ft/39.02 meters.  Steve says his home brewed tuned feeders exhibit lower loss than commercially available 450 ohm ladder line. This would make an excellent weekend project and will convert your single band dipole into a multi-band antenna.  You will need a balanced "tuner" to complete the antenna package.  You could also connect your home brewed ladder line to a 4:1 balun, followed by a short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable from the balun to your antenna "tuner."  Good luck!  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).