Thursday, March 31, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--10/15/20m Trap Vertical Antenna, Part 1 of 4. Post #733.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/SLcGN0P1Xjs.  An informative, straight-forward, and enjoyable tutorial on how to make a 10/15/20 meter trap vertical antenna from Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ).  This is part 1 of a 4 part series.  Dave does an excellent job of explaining the theory, design, and construction of this versatile antenna which can fit on a small residential lot.  Most of the materials can be bought at the nearest hardware store or home improvement outlet.  Follow Dave's instructions closely, and by the time you reach part 4, you'll be ready to use this proven antenna design.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Random Wire Solution for an "Interior Shack". Post #732,


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/uxDijG90dM.  If you're "antenna challenged" by CC&Rs and HOAs, then this video tutorial on random wire antennas from stancoyote (WB2LQF) will help you get on the air undetected with a decent signal, even if your shack is located on the second floor of your home or situated deep withing your house. If you follow stan's guidance, you can eliminate RFI issues before they arise.  Be sure you have a decent balun, a counterpoise system, and a sturdy antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  With care and attention to detail, you can duplicate this antenna, which covers all amateur radio bands between 80 and 10 meters.  I've built a few of these antennas, and they work remarkably well, considering the limitations inherent in the design. Good luck!  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Multi-Band HF Vertical Antenna. Post #731


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/pi8ysNBDDBg.  Here's another idea for a multiband vertical antenna that uses few parts, is inexpensive, and can fit into a restricted space.  The hams at ResistanceHams shows us how to build a tri-band HF vertical antenna covering the 10, 15, and 20 meter Amateur Radio bands. The ground plane for this vertical antenna is a steel shed--a bit unconventional, but it works.  At times, I've used the metal roof over my house as a ground plane for 40 meters.  It works fairly well.  I remember a Field Day operation at Laupahoehoe Point where a group of dedicated QRP operators, led by Dean Manley (KH6B), used the metal roof of a large pavilion at the beach park for a 160 meter ground plane.  The impromptu steel roof worked very well and many 160 meter contacts were made.  If you want to ground mount this tri-band HF vertical, be sure to use a ground radial or counterpoise system. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, March 28, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--100 watt 7 MHz magnetic loop for units and apartments


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please enter this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/Cv_RnLpZ9gw.  In this well-produced video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us how to design, build, and use a 100 watt 7 MHz magnetic loop antenna for restricted places such as apartments or in areas where HOAs and CC&Rs are present.  Peter says there are no hard to get parts or complex workshop skills needed to build this portable antenna.  Instead of an expensive vacuum variable capacitor, Peter uses a length of RG-213 coaxial cable (approximately 1.85 meters long and 3mm circumference loop for 7 MHz). The sliding capacitor dimensions are approximately 6 cm x 8 cm.  Since this loop carries a lot of potentially dangerous voltage, please use this antenna away from your shack.  If you've got the time and need a highly portable antenna for restricted areas or for portable use, try Peter's magnetic loop antenna. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  This is post #730 of a continuing series.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

When You Least Expect It, Expect It! Post #729

Antenna Feed Line Problems: Expect the unexpected
(http://www.eham.net/articles/35989).
Accessed on 28 March 2016, 00:03 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Patrick Greenlee (NJ5G).
Please click title link to read the full article.

Comment:

This intriguing article from Patrick Greenlee (NJ5G) entitled "When You Least Expect It, Expect it!" can apply to many radio amateurs who have unexplained and often frustrating SWR problems on their coaxial fed antennas.  In the past whenever I ran into the problem described by Patrick, I just "junked" the old coax, substituted a new coax cable feeder, checked SWR, and continued to enjoy "warming the ether."  Patrick has taken this troublesome issue one step further. He actually dissected his old coax to find the real cause of the unwieldy SWR readings he was getting.  He eventually discovered that the inner wire of the coax had shorted to the coax shield, thus giving erratic SWR readings.  He also found some coax "barrel" connectors and other attachments weren't made properly, leading to a multitude of issues.  Those responding to this well-written article offered some valuable tips on caring for coaxial cable:  coil  coax loosely, avoid tight turns and twists; buy quality coax and connectors; and replace old coax when SWR starts to rise.  Nicely done discussion on a feedline problem faced by many radio amateurs.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Homebrew Antenna Launcher-Ham Radio. Post# 728.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/unliqNuzNHI.  One of the problems associated with portable and camping operations is how to place an antenna high enough to do some good. In this video, Tinker John (W5CYF) solves that issue with a simple, elegant, inexpensive, and effective homebrew antenna launcher that can be made in less than 30 minutes with material available at the nearest hardware store or building supply outlet.  Practice a bit before you use this variation of a slingshot to launch your antenna into a high tree.  Good luck!  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, March 25, 2016

Camping with Ham Radio. Post #727.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/K7go9vCN99w.  The combination of hiking, camping, and amateur radio make for an enjoyable afternoon of physical exercise (we all need some of this) and pure radio enjoyment.  In this video, Tinker John (W5CYF) shows us just how easy and lightweight a HF station can be.  On this trip to the wilderness, John uses a MFJ-9420 20 meter SSB transceiver, a MFJ antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"), a portable dipole erected between two trees, and a 12-volt/7.5 Ah SLA (sealed lead acid) gel cell for power.  Hopefully, this video will give you some ideas on how fun and easy it is to operate a portable amateur radio station.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Buddipole Ham Antenna Camping Set Up. Post #726.


If you're experiencing trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=v9m7XpgGkB4.  If you enjoy taking amateur radio along with you on your hiking and camping trips, then you know how important are the weight and ease of construction of your antennas.  In this video, Tinker John (W5CYF) show us how to set up the Buddipole Antenna system for camping.  The Buddipole Antenna kit is a well-made, high quality, and outstanding performer given its size.  The Buddipole Antenna System can also be used in CC&R and HOA-restricted neighborhoods as a "stealth" antenna.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Installing a Halyard for a Field Day Antenna. Post #725


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/6fHNt1u26Rw.  Raising and lowering an antenna during a Field Day event can be easier if you prepare a halyard beforehand.  In this video from Dick Christoper (N1LT), we see members of the Central New Hampshire Amateur Radio Club using a halyard during the 26 June 2013 ARRL Field Day.  This simple device allows you to raise and lower antennas for various bands safely and efficiently.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

The Radio Amateur's Code. Post #724.

The Radio Amateur's Code. (http://www.w2lj.blogspot.com/2016/03/the-radio-amateur's-code.html).
Accessed on 23 March 2016, 06:34 hrs, UTC.
Reporter:  Larry Makoski (W2LJ).

A timely reminder about the challenges and responsibilities of Amateur Radio. The original "code" was written in 1928 by Paul M. Segal (W9EE) and has been modified several times to fit the times.  Larry Makoski (W2LJ) adds some personal observations about our shared hobby, which make a lot of sense.  Particularly noteworthy is Larry's emphasis on "balance" and common sense when it comes to Amateur Radio.  Segal's thoughts are impressive, easily understood, and much needed in a world turned cold and unfeeling.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, March 21, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Building a Moxon-Beam Antenna. Post #723.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/MKmpZ7j2ms8.  In my last post (#722), I listed a website that would give you the basics of designing and building a Moxon Antenna.  In this post, we shift from theory to actual construction, as   Stefan (DL7AOS) shows us how to build a simple 20 meter Moxon Beam Antenna.  You'll probably need some help in erecting this beam, but the performance is worth the effort.  I've seen a few 10 meter Moxon Beam Antennas at various Field Day Events, and their performance is quite good.  A Moxon 20 meter Beam Antenna would make an excellent radio club project.  For more information on this type of antenna, visit http://www.ac6la.com/moxgen/DL7AOS/DL7AOS.htm.  Good luck!  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--The Moxon Antenna Project. Post #722

The Moxon Antenna Project.
(http://www.moxonantennaproject.com).
Accessed on 20 March 2016, 01:15 hrs, UTC).
Author:  Steve Hammer (K6SGH).

Comment:

Here's all you want to know about the stealthy gain antennas designed by the late Les Moxon (G6XN).  Webmaster Steve Hammer (K6SGH) has done an excellent job of explaining the theory, design, and working properties of this unusual rectangle antenna that can be crafted for both HF and VHF/UHF work.

Steve recommends you start with a simple rectangular moxon for 6 meters and 2 meters.  Steve says, "The moxon rectangle is a superb antenna that is fun to build, works like a champ and is virtually indestructible."

The moxon design is great for portable, emergency, Field Day, and home use. Try one--you'll be pleasantly surprised. At the end of his article, Steve lists more than 30 moxon projects you can try at your home or next Field Day.  Have fun!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, March 19, 2016

Simple Ham Antennas--How An Antenna Trap Works. Post #721.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZM-SxSyC5A.  In this video by Stan Gibilisco (W1GV), we learn some of the basic theory and practice behind antenna traps.  Simply put, an antenna trap is "a bandstop filter in an antenna radiator."  Excellently done and presented video tutorial from Stan.  For more information, visit:  http://www.sciencewriter.net.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, March 18, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Building a trap dipole for 7 and 14 MHz. Post #720.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/LbEAwAG1KMA.  A trap dipole is a good choice if you want to operate on only two or three bands and don't want to adjust an antenna transmatch (i.e. tuner/coupler) to change bands.  If you follow the instructions given by Peter Parker (VK3YE) in this well-produced video tutorial, you'll have this simple, efficient antenna working for you in short order.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Ham Stick Vertical Dipole Antenna. Post #719.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box" https://youtu.be/CbQwLPVmG70.  In this video, Brian Downs show us how to use Ham Stick style Antennas in a vertical configuration. This arrangement could come in handy for portable operations or for areas with restricted antenna space.  Brian uses a set of 20 meter Ham Sticks to make the vertical dipole.  You can get 20 meter to 10 meter coverage if you feed the antenna with 450 ohm ladder line, use a 4:1 balun, and a short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable to connect the balanced line and balun combination to your antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--The Fence Dipole (FFD). Post #718

The Fence Dipole (FFD): A Quick, Easy, and Inexpensive Multiband Antenna. Post #718.
(http://www.eham.net/articles/35785.
Accessed on 16 March 2016, 23:46 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Howard Groverman (W6HDG).
Please click on title link to read the full story.

Comment:

If you're living in a HOA or CC&R environment or just lack enough space to build numerous antennas, then the Fence Dipole (FFD) from Howard Groverman (W6HDG) may be the solution to your antenna problem.  This variant of the Fan Dipole is "quick, easy, and inexpensive" to design, build, and use.  Howard provides all of the illustrations, photos, and antenna data you need to get started. This would make a perfect weekend project with both at-home and portable use applications.  Most of the materials can be found at the nearest hardware store or building supply outlet.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us tod


Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--The Windom Antenna. Post #717.

The Windom Antenna
(http://www.packetradio.com/windom.htm).
Accessed on 16 March 2016, 05:46 hours.
Author:  C.E. "Buck" Rogers (K4ABT).
Please click title link to read the full article.

Comment:

If you want to experiment with dipole antennas, why not try designing, building, and using the classic "Windom" Antenna?  This antenna dates back to 1923 when William Litell Everitt began working with simple off center fed dipoles.  In the intervening years, the off center fed dipole, used with either ladder line or coaxial cable, has become a basic multiband antenna used around the world.

C.E. "Buck" Rogers (K4ABT) has written an exhaustive study of this classic wire antenna, tracing its history back to the early 1920s and bringing the design up to date for 2016.

Rogers illustrates some of the basic OCF designs with a variety of graphs, SWR plots, and patterns.  He provides essential dimensions for wire length, antenna feed options, and suitable baluns that will enable you to use amateur radio bands between 80 and 6 meters without an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  Antenna tuners can be used to extend coverage down to 160 meters.  His instructions are clear and easily understood.

If you feel adventuresome, try a classic HF antenna such as the Windom or one of its off center fed variants.  You may be pleasantly surprised with the performance of this "oldie, but goodie" from our amateur radio past.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, March 14, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HF Portable Antenna System 10-80P North Huron Communications


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/-PZN7InAUug.  Here's an interesting portable antenna from North Huron Communications.  According to the video, the 10-80P is an HF portable antenna system usable in the frequency range of 3.5 MHz to 30 MHz. The system can be used with any HF transceiver and handles up to 250 watts PEP.  The antenna kit comes with brass clip sections, tripod bracket, counterpoise wire, coil, and other accessories.  This appears to be a quality product that could be used for both home and portable use.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  This is post #716. 

Saturday, March 12, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Ham Radio - Using Fiberglass Poles for HF Portable Operation


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/GMxZWvGzfIE.  Nicely done video by Tracy (VK3TWM) on how to use telescoping fiberglass poles for portable antenna supports.  These poles are available from Jackite, MFJ, and a few other outlets.  In this video, Tracy put the fed end of the antenna up high on the pole due to past success with this method.  Others may prefer attaching the feed line at the base of the fiberglass pole. These collapsable poles can be stored in your vehicle or home shack for emergency or portable use.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, March 11, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--3 minute portable HF vertical antenna. Post #714.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/RIvW9f--JOI.  Here's an interesting challenge from Peter Parker (VK3YE).  Can you unpack and set up a portable vertical antenna in 3 minutes or less?  The key to this solution is having a telescoping 9 meter mast, 10 meters of wire, a decent ground radial or counterpoise system, and a L-match antenna coupler (tuner).  This quick set-up antenna would be perfect for portable or emergency operations.  Lots of good ideas here!  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Dipole Center-Loaded with Ladder Line. Post #713.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/FfLIL9yjy0A.  One of the simplest, effective antennas you can make is the center-loaded dipole fed with 50 ohm (RG-58, RG-8, RG-8X) cable or with 75 ohm (RG-59 or RG-6) cable.  This antenna is cut for the frequency band of your choice and is most effective and efficient as a monoband antenna.  Multiband operation can be obtained by using 300 ohm television twin lead or 450 ohm ladder line connected to a balanced tuner or a balun to tuner combination.  Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) does an excellent job of explaining the theory, design, and construction of this classic half wavelength dipole antenna, which can be used for a single band (coax fed into your transceiver) or multiband purposes with ladder line into a tuner.  Most of the materials for this basic antenna can be bought at the nearest hardware store or home building supply outlet.  Placed as high as you can get it, this simple antenna will deliver hours of great contacts, both local and international.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Discover the Discone for HF. Post #712,


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your blog search box: https://youtu.be/N5U2_G5zE.  Here's another vertical antenna design borrowed from the military that could be worth adding to your "antenna farm."  In this video, Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) explains the theory, design, and operation of the HF Discone Antenna.  While many radio amateurs are familiar with VHF/UHF discone antennas, few of us have seen or used the larger version for HF.  This antenna contains a lot of wire and takes time to design and build properly.  The trade off is an antenna with a broader bandwidth than your usual vertical monopole.  For more details on this antenna, please visit:  https://archive.org/stream/73-magazine-1985-05/05_May_1985#page/n17/node/2up.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Conical Monopole Antenna. Post #711.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/sScrfbf0ulg.  If you want a broadband vertical antenna, then the conical monopole antenna described by Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) may be what you need.  Years ago, this antenna was popular with military communications sites.  Stan describes the theory, design, and construction details of this unique vertical antenna.  As with all vertical antennas, a good ground radial system is needed to obtain peak performance. You can research this antenna further at this site:  http://www.rfcafe.com/references/qst/conical-monopole-antenna-november-1966-qst.htm.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, March 7, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--ZS6BKW Installation. Post #710.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/rTMMG0AeKMg.  Here's another multiband HF antenna that traces its ancestry to the G5RV designed by Louis Varney (G5RV).  The ZS6BKW is an optimized variant of Varney's original 20 meter antenna design. You can either make one yourself or order one from an amateur radio supply outlet.  What's interesting about Alex's (PA1FOX) installation is the care he takes when he rigs the antenna from the steep roof of his house.  If you choose to have your home support one leg of this antenna, be sure to have a partner help you.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, March 6, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--G5RV Antenna Explained. Post #709.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/IBCA0hNavww.  Here's an interesting HF antenna that may prove valuable on your antenna farm, no matter how modest. In this excellent video tutorial from"Alton Antenna Arrays", we learn the basic theory, design, and operation of the popular G5RV HF antenna.  The original design comes from the inventive mind of the late Louis Varney (G5RV), who created this antenna design for the 20 meter band.  The antenna resembles a dipole, but with each antenna element being 3/4 wavelength long, making the antenna a 3/2 wavelength antenna with several useful lobes.  The antenna can be use on several HF amateur radio bands with an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"). The antenna really shines as a monoband antenna for whatever band you choose. In this video, the G5RV has been adapted for the 12 meter band (24.9 MHz). This antenna is easily made from locally available materials.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, March 5, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Triband end-fed half wave antenna for portable use. Post #708.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/TV3Cj2J3T20.  If you want an easy to build, effective, portable antenna covering the 40, 20, and 10 meter amateur radio bands, then Peter Parker (VK3YE) may have what you need.  In this well-produced video, Peter shows us how to build a full-sized half wave antenna for 20 meters and a loaded half wave antenna for 40 meters using the same length of antenna wire.  The antenna will also work well on 10 meters.  According to Peter, "a broadband transformer replaces the antenna coupler...its only disadvantage is its bandwidth on 40 meters", which "is somewhat narrow (150 kHz)."  Peter says he based this antenna on commercial models marketed by Par End-Fed Antennas.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, March 4, 2016

Simple Ham Radiio Antennas--160m kite antenna again! Post #707.

fDiXNnimcRY
If you're have trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/fDiXNnimcRY.  Here's another interesting way to launch a full quarter wave vertical for 160 meters--use a kite!  In this video, VK5ZVS uses a French military kite, a suitable length of 7X 7 stranded steel wire (1.2 mm thickness), a tuner, a low power transceiver, and a ground connection to hoist his 160 meter antenna into the air.  He made several 25 watt SSB contacts on 160 meters. Most of the materials can be bought from the nearest hardware store or home improvment outlet.  It's important to have a good ground radial or counterpoise system for this vertical to work safely and efficiently.  For the latest  Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--160 Meter Balloon Antenna. Post #706.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please enter this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/dpoZT8TOHsM.  Here's an interesting way to launch a 160 Meter vertical antenna.  In this video, K0RU, W9RNY, and W9SN use a helium filled balloon to support a 3/8 wavelength vertical antenna for 160 meters.  The antenna is 207-feet/63.10-meters long, has 4 ground-mounted radials, and uses a "tuner" at the base of the antenna.  This trio of friends says the performance of this antenna is quite good.  Before you try this antenna on  "top band", collect a few friends to help you and get permission from the FAA and FCC if you'll be using a balloon to support your antenna near an airport.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

How to Build a Dummy Load for Ham Radio! Post #705.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/V6PcR1mXpt0.  Every amateur radio station should have a "dummy load" as one of its basic test instruments.  Dummy loads or "Phantom Antennas" allow you to test transceivers off the air without creating unnecessary interference. In this well-produced video, Tony Milluzzi (KD8RTT) shows us how to make a simple, inexpensive dummy load that is usable up to 25 watts--perfect for testing QRP or portable radio gear.  You can get the resistor from your "junk box" or from http://digikey.com/product-search. This would make an excellent club project.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Simple Ham Antennas--N4LQ Multiband Inverted L Antenna. Post #704.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=uuD2mBZKHOg.  Here's another great idea for a 160 meter HF antenna for restricted spaces.  Steve Ellington (N4LQ)'s original idea consisted of a 100-ft/30.48 meters wire run up a tree to an approximate height of 50-feet/15.24 meters and then run horizontally to a Rohn 50-ft/15.24 meters mast. Steve later extended the antenna to 200-ft/60.97 meters.  He used a workshop to house his antenna relay system, tuner (MFJ-998), test equipment, and endpoint for his extensive counterpoise wire system.  The video does an excellent job of displaying this versatile antenna and how it connects to his counterpoise system and main station in his home. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).