Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Six Meter Folded Dipole Antenna. Post #792.


If you're having difficulty in viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/qbje13U6hC4.  Here's a simple, easily made folded dipole antenna for the 6 Meter Amateur Radio band.  Claude Jollet does an excellent job of explaining the design and construction of this antenna. According to Claude, the folded dipole is made from ladder line, fed with ladder line, and matched with a 4:1 "step down coaxial balun" at the bottom of the transmission line.  The antenna is resonant at 50.4 MHz.  The reported SWR is 1.3 to 1 between 50.0 MHz and 51.0 MHz.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 30, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Open-Wire Dipole Antenna. Post #791.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/wMPk45MVFp.  Well-done, easily understandable tutorial on the theory, design, and use of an open-wire dipole antenna for the HF amateur radio bands.  This antenna is a simple, efficient, and proven HF antenna design that will give you many hours of pleasure as you search for contacts on the amateur radio bands.  Cut the antenna elements for the 80 meter band, feed the antenna with open-wire, and use a balanced tuner or tuner with balun combination, and you'll have an antenna that will cover all amateur radio bands from 80 meters through 10 meters.  If you can only build one HF antenna on your property, go for the open-wire dipole with open-wire feeders.For more information on this dipole antenna, contact Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) at http://www.sciencewriter.net.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HF tape measure horizontal dipole antenna. Post #790.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/PiU6x9aZT7A.  KI4PMI and NC4FB present an interesting approach to building a horizontal dipole antenna covering Amateur Radio Bands from 6 meters to 40 meters.  The antenna elements are steel tape measures, which you can find at hardware stores and home improvement outlets. I've built a few tape measure yagi/beam antennas for 2 meters, but I've never gone as far as building a tape measure dipole suitable for HF. Bands are selected by varying the lengths of the tape measures.  The video is well done and easy to follow.  This could be my next project.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Ham Radio 40/80 Meter Inverted V Dipole Antenna. Post #789


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser seach box: https://youtu.be/wgIbWafVnSc.  I've always enjoyed Dave Turlock's (KG0ZZ) videos for their clarity, ease of understanding, and production value.  This video on how to make a 40/80 meter Inverted V Dipole Antenna is no exception.  This two-band HF antenna is easy to design and build.  Loading coils make this antenna a full-size structure on 40 meters and a shortened antenna for 80 meters.  This antenna would be ideal for radio amateurs who live on small urban lots.  If you have the room, you may want to add 160 meters to this antenna for some interesting contacts on "The Gentlemen's Band."  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, May 27, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Zepp Antenna Theory. Post #788.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/TwYSS335wZw.  Interesting alternative explanation of the theory, design, and construction behind the "Zepp Antenna" from Stan Gibilisco (W1GV).  You may want to build one of these antennas just to see how well it works in your location.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How to hide 20 Meter Ham Radio Antenna on Balcony


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/Puo3YB2NEfA. This is post #787 of a continuing series on Simple Amateur Radio Antennas. Here's another idea of how to use a "stealth" antenna to get on the air.  In this case, RLG261 uses some MFJ parts and a floor flange to hide his 20 Meter Ham Radio Antenna from prying eyes.  For this project, RLG261 uses a MFJ-347 diple mount with two MFJ-2620T antennas. The antennas are mounted with a 1/2"/1.27 cm floor flange using a 1/2"/1.27 cm by 8"/20.32 cm pipe.  The flange is secured to the rafters with #12 sheet metal screws measuring 3/4"/1.905 cm long.  RLG261 recommends this antenna for receiving purposes only, since it may violate the National Electrical Code.  He did use the antenna for a few short QRP transmissions (less than 10 watts) and was satisfied that the antenna functioned well. You may find this antenna usable in other locations.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--The Alpha EZ Military Antenna For 6-80 meters. Post #786


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qie3ynllJ3c.  Here's another antenna idea for radio amateurs operating from a HOA/CC&R property.
In this video, we learn how to set up and operate the Alpha EZ Military Antenna for 6-80 meters.  This small, compact, and easily portable antenna is ideal for portable and emergency use or for those of us operating in deed-restricted homes or apartments.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--MP1 Super Antenna – A Second Look. Post #785


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/w9xuw2h8D34.  If you need a compact HF antenna for emergency or portable operations, then the MP1 Super Antenna could be what you're looking for.  In this update of an earlier MP1 Antenna review, Tinker John (W5CYF) investigates the often critical tuning procedure used with this amazingly compact HF antenna.  In this post, Tinker John uses tuned radials and the frequency guide supplied by New Super Antennas.  John says the MP1 is "by no means a perfect antenna but its does a pretty good job for its size and weight."  You may want to put this antenna on your shopping list.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 23, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--New folded dipole wire antenna for HF. Post #784


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/l2vhS8QWfbo.  In this video by "vener6", we see another way of designing and building a folded dipole wire antenna for the HF amateur radio bands.  This antenna was built to replace an old dipole antenna that was no longer serviceable.  The balun is made from19-20 turns of RG-8U coaxial cable wound on a 3-inch/7.62 cm pvc pipe.  Vener6 says this antenna does an excellent job on 80 meters.  Hopefully, this antenna will encourage you to build a folded dipole antenna for your ham station. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--40m Compact 4-Square Antenna. Post #783

40m Compact 4-Square Antenna
(http://www.dxzone.com/dx32966/40m-compact-4-square).
Accessed on 23 May 2016, 00:23 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Les (EA5AVL).

Here's an antenna design that could provide a good, consistent signal on the 40 meter Amateur Radio band.  Les (EA5AVL) wrote this intriguing article for http://www.dxzone.com.  According to Les "the antenna was designed to provide excellent communications on the 40m band, utilizing readily available components and be relatively easy to construct."  Les says the antenna performed well during the 2007-2011 time frame, when there was a sunspot minimum.  This antenna would make a good club project for the ARRL Field Day, which will be held 25-26 June 2016.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antenas--Multi-Band HF Fan Dipole Antenna Construction. Post #782.

h
If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/PT1kSQjQIkM.  Nicely done video tutorial on how to design, make, and use a multi-band HF fan dipole antenna.  Alex (KD0YNH) and Cory (N0ECK) take us through a simple step-by-step process in building this antenna.  The antenna is designed to cover the 80, 40, 20, and 15 meter amateur radio bands without an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"). With an antenna "tuner", this dipole should be able to cover additional HF bands.  A good antenna for those radio amateurs who don't have antenna "tuners" or would rather not use them.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, May 20, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Random Wire Antenna Lengths. Post #781.

Random Wire Antenna Lengths
(http://www.udel.edu/~mm/ham/randomWire/).
Accessed on 21 May 2016, 06:33 hrs, UTC.
Author:  The University of Delaware.

Comment:

A properly designed random wire antenna is a joy to use.  It's portable, inexpensive, and easy to store.

However, there are a few design parameters that you must follow if you want to use random wire antennas.  This easily understood tutorial from The University of Delaware will give you the key design basics for this antenna.

Among the topics discussed are:  The antenna lengths to avoid and the importance of using a ground radial or "counterpoise" system.  For best results, use at least a 1/4 wavelength antenna for each band you use.  An antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") and a ground radial system will keep rfi out of your shack and improve the efficiency of the random wire.  If you want multiband capability from 80 meters through 10 meters, consider using the original design from W3EDP.  This antenna is an off-center fed dipole with element lengths of 84-feet/25.92 meters and 17-feet/5.18 meters.  You can find an article on the W3EDP antenna in the "pages" category in the left hand sidebar of this blog.  Don't be afraid to experiment.  You can learn a lot from building your own antennas and accessories.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today.  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Antennas: How many do I need? Post #780.

Antennas: How many do I need?
(http://www.hamradioschool.com/antennas-how-many-do-i-need/).
Accessed on 19 May 2016, 21:04 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Bob Witte (K0NR).

This well-written article was prompted by a question raised in a Technician License Class Bob was teaching.  The question is far from simple, because it involves the type of operating a new licensee wishes to pursue.  Of course, Bob is correct when he says, "You can never have too many antennas."

But, for the newly licensed ham, that question boggles the mind.  Bob answers that question by focusing on a few basic antenna parameters:

What bands do newly licensed hams want to explore?  If the answer is VHF/UHF, FM simplex, and FM repeaters, then there are a few good choices, including the Diamond X-50A, the Comet GP-3, and the Arrow Open Slot J-Pole.

If the new license wants to add HF to the mix, he/she can chose from a wide selection of wire antennas, such as a multiband dipole, an end-fed wire with tuner and ground radial system, a trap dipole, a half-wavelength end fed wire, a fan dipole, and a multiband vertical.

Bob briefly touches on the need for an antenna transmatch (i.e. tuner) and some other inexpensive accessories.  The most important thing, however, is to get a usable antenna on the air and make some contacts.  Antenna knowledge will come slowly as you experiment and build various antenna designs.

Bob's introduction to basic antenna theory is easy to understand and will help the newly licensed ham get on the air and experience the fun of amateur radio.
-----------------------------------
For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--2014 Field Day - Free Standing Painter Pole Fan Dipole with W4EDF


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/yM6TGiFkdMM.  I ran into this interesting video from W4EDF while I was searching for Field Day antennas.  The ARRL Field Day will be held on 25 June to 26 June 2016 at thousands of remote and public areas across the United States and Canada.  Field Day is the largest amateur radio emergency exercise of the year.  Field Day also has become a popular contest for hams around the world.  In this excellent video tutorial, W4EDF shows us how to assemble and deploy a guy-supported painter pole fan dipole antenna.  This antenna was used at his 2014 Field Day site with good effect.  Materials, wires, knots, poles, and guying techniques are shown throughout the video.  Perhaps this simple multiband antenna will be your choice at your Field Day site.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Amateurlogic90: Everybody's Talking About Antennas. Post #778.

Amateurlogic90: Everybody's Talking About Antennas
(http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/may/amateurlogic_90.htm).
Accessed on 18 May 2016, 04:26 hrs, UTC.

Amateurlogic is one of the better amateur radio-themed programs online.  In this edition (program 90), a distinguished panel of guests discusses some interesting antennas you may want to try out in your spare time.  Included in the 1:02:10 program:
Tommy's Antenna Hangings.
Emile's Wet Noodle Antenna.
George builds a Hula Hoop Antenna.

An interesting, information-packed program.  If you can't download the video from the http://www.southgate.org site, please use this URL:  http://www.amateurlogic.com/downloads.htm.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 16, 2016

Earths, losses and vertical antennas. Post #777.

Earths, losses and vertical antennas
(http://www.robkalmeijer.nl/technek/electronica/radiotechniek/hambleden/radcom/1992/10/page35/index.html).
Please click link to read the full article and to view examples of Bobtail Curtain antennas.
Author:  Rob Kalmeijer.

Rob Kalmeijer has assembled an easily understood tutorial on the design, construction, and use of Bobtail Curtain Antennas.  Bobtail Curtain Antennas are excellent low-angle vertical radiators exhibiting a broadside, bidirectional pattern. These antennas offer modest gain and some directivity. Most Bobtail Curtain arrays are used for single band use, but can be adapted to other bands with a sturdy antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  HF Bobtail Curtains use a lot of space especially for frequencies of 7 MHz and below.  A 10 meter Bobtail Curtain Antenna is certainly manageable and can be used to good advantage when the band is open.  The illustrations accompanying the tutorial will give you a general idea of the dimensions involved.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today! Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Sunday, May 15, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--A bobtail gain antenna for 432 MHz. Post #776.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/FgJVuEq5Its.  Bobtail curtain antennas are a lot of fun to design, build, and use if you have plenty of help erecting them. For HF amateur radio bands, the top phasing sections can be quite long and cumbersome.  I've built a few bobtail antennas for 10 meters and those projects were  doable by myself.  If you "want to get your feet wet" in designing this antenna, why not follow Peter Parker's (VK3YE) example and build one for the 70 cm amateur radio band (432 MHz)?  The antenna won't be too large and will be easy to handle.  This could be the antenna you're looking for to hit that distant repeater or to use for portable operations.  This antenna can be made from common parts found in a home building outlet or in your neighborhood hardware store.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Attic Antennas for Ham Radio. Post # 775.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please check insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/OqzofoHDu-U.  If you live in an antenna-restricted area governed by a HOA or CC&R agreement, an attic antenna will get you on the air without being seen and, hopefully, heard by neighbors.  In this video, Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) shows you how to design, build, and use an attic antenna that will give you hours of enjoyment without raising the curiosity of nosey neighbors or your association board.  Remember the old rule:  "Out of sight, out of mind."  Good luck.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, May 13, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Tune for max brightness: LED RF current indicator for end-fed antennas


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please check insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjHyXi1SrZs. Here's a handy, simple, and useful RF current indicator for your end-fed antenna using only 3 parts.  Peter Parker (VK3YE).  A nice addition to any ham shack. This project would make an excellent presentation at your next club meeting. For the latest Amateur Radio news and developments, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--The Half Square Wire Antenna for 10 MHz (and more). Post #773.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=v4x5inJcajw.  Another great antenna tutorial from Peter Parker (VK3YE).  In this video, Peter shows us how to design, build, test, and use a half-square antenna for the 10 meter amateur radio band.  Although half-square antennas are used for single bands, they can be used on several ham bands with a few modifications.  Peter set his antenna up on a nearby beach and got some interesting contacts with the Canary Islands (EA8AYT/M) on 10 meters, N1UP on 20 meters, and even a contact on 40 meters.  I'm sure Peter's proximity to the seashore helped launch his signal at a low angle.  Half-square antennas are easy to build, give a broadside signal, and offer a modest gain of between 2 and 3 dB over a dipole. Peter's antenna is easily made and can be use both at home or in the field.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Making broadband ferrite transformers for radio & antenna projects. Post #772.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/L5B_0Psor9Q.  Broadband ferrite transformers are used in many radio and antenna baluns.  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us some applications of ferrite transformers and how to make baluns for antennas.  Well-done, easily understood video.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events,  please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--End fed portable all band dipole setup and 150W matchbox 9:1 unun


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/IQVTnKQuKaM.  Here's another interesting, portable multiband HF antenna from "nelson antennas."  The key to this handy and easily useable antenna is the matchbox with an internal 9:1 unun transformer made with 20 gauge wire in a trifilar winding.  The antenna wire can be a  arranged in a sloper, vertical, or inverted L configuration with one lead connected to the antenna bolt and the ground radial or counterpoise system connected to the other bolt.  In this video, the transceiver is a Yaesu FT-897D and the antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") is a LDG-YT 100.  If you don't want to make your own 9:1 unun, you can go to "nelson_antennas" on eBay.  The eBay identification number is 191226640113.  Good luck! This is post #771. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 9, 2016

Hardware and Hook Up Wire System - Harbor Freight. Post #770.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/Q3fOMt8S1DU.  I found this interesting video from EMT/firefighter Eddie Zarick while I was searching for ways to better organize my radio room. My old system of putting parts, wire, coax, and tools into plastic boxes around my shack was just not working.  My shack was a mess!  I found Eddie's suggestions most helpful, since his job demands a certain amount of "strategic location" to perform his duties quickly and efficiently. Eddie's garage is certainly neater than my ham shack in the backyard. Using Harbor Freight storage cases, Eddie has designed a system which keeps 20 spools of wire stored, organized, and easily accessible. These storage boxes also can be used to keep tools, nuts/bolts, and screws handy for any project. Sometimes, a non-ham can suggest a better way to organize and manage your radio room. This well-done video does just that.  Thanks to Eddie and his garage layout, my radio room is better organized, has more space, and remains one of my favorite rooms in my house.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Newton's Guide to Technical Excellence. Post #769.

Newton's Guide to Technical Excellence.
(http://www.eham.net/articles/36164).
Accessed on 09 May 2016, 03:34 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Howard Walker (KI4VEO).

This somewhat "tongue in cheek" look at the pitfalls of buying ham radio equipment is "spot on."  Just reading some of Howard's cautionary notes and observations makes me remember some dubious radio purchases made in years past.  I found items 1 through 5 and 8 through 11 most common from my experience.  Please note some of the incisive comments from other radio amateurs at the end of Howard's article.  This well-done analysis of the radio buying act reads like a guide to "Murphy's Law".  I suppose all of us have fallen to at least one of the "truths" in this article.

What I can never figure out is why a reputable radio manufacturer, such as ICOM, discontinues a decent rig like the IC-7200 after a short run, and opts for new designs with numerous flaws.  What comes to mind is the brilliant but seriously flawed ICOM-746.  Of course, there are exceptions.  ICOM is still producing the ICOM-718, which is a sturdy, dependable, and affordable HF transceiver--perfect for the newly licensed ham or for a standby rig in a ham shack. Another great ICOM rig is the ICOM-703, perfect for the QRP enthusiast. That rig is no longer is production.  I suppose the point of all this is to prepare for planned obsolescence, whether it be ham equipment, cars, computers, or anything else. We have to keep the factories running and people employed.  This dismal scenario will probably change once SDRs become more popular and updates are simply a matter of downloading software.  But, for now, I'm content to use my almost classic rigs--Kenwood 520s, Yaesu FT-7, Swan-100MX, Ten-Tec Scout.  My one concession to progress is a fairly new Elecraft KX3.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Simple dipole antenna from coax. Post #768.


If you're experiencing difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/N_rUeIMYXbg.  Crystal clear, simple, and effective video from OH2FTG on how to build a dipole antenna. Properly designed and built, a simple dipole antenna will give you hours of radio pleasure at a modest cost.  Part of the fun of amateur radio is building your own wire antennas.  This well-done video will explain just how easy it is to build a dipole antenna for the band of your choice.  Plus, you'll have the knowledge that you built something for yourself that actually works.  Good luck!  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, May 6, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How-to build your own HF Antenna Splitter. Post #767.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/idDmf4bNMYw.  Here's a practical device that will serve both shortwave listeners and radio amateurs.  In this video, "The Radio Hobbyist" shows us how to share one antenna among several receivers, using a simple switch. This cheap, easily-assembled, and portable antenna switch is for receiving only.  Most of the materials can be found in your "junk" box, at the nearest hamfest, or through a variety of amateur radio dealers.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily. Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Ultimate Bugout Mobile Portable Ham Radio Survival Setup 9-22-2015. Post #766.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/veij7M7tZzk.  Exceptionally well-done presentation by "videosbymike" on how to assemble the "ultimate bugout mobile portable ham radio survival setup."  Mike's portable system is lightweight, efficient, and easy to deploy for emergencies or operations "in the field."  Mike's system uses the Yaesu FT-857D HF/VHF/UHF transceiver, a LDG YT-100 antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"), a 14 Ahr AGM sealed lead-acid battery, an 80-watt sine wave inverter, and two, 20-watt solar panels. Mike also demonstrates some of the HF and VHF antennas he uses with this portable station.  There are many great ideas in this well-paced video.  Every radio amateur should have a backup station for emergencies or portable use.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How to Build a ZS6BKW Antenna. Post #765.

How to Build a ZS6BKW Antenna (optimized G5RV)
(https://www.vk4mdx.wordpress.com/2013/09/02/how=to-build-a-zs6bkw-antenna-optimized-g5rv-antenna/).
Accessed on 05 May 2016, 02:21 hrs, UTC.
Author:  David Olsen (VK4MDX).

The original G5RV antenna designed by Louis Varney (G5RV) (SK) continues to serve radio amateurs well around the world.  Although Varney clearly designed this dipole as a 3/2 wavelength antenna for 20 meters, it can be used on amateur radio bands from 80 meters through 10 meters with a suitable tuner. Performance on bands other than 20 meters can be variable because of many factors, including feedline length, the type of feedline, and very high SWRs on some bands.  As a 20 meter antenna, the G5RV does an excellent job.  On other amateur radio bands, performance often suffers.

However, with a few modifications regarding antenna element length and the correct combination of 50 ohm coaxial cable and 450 ohm ladder line, it's possible to improve the all-band performance of Louis Varney's original idea without encountering destructive SWRs or marginal signals.

In this post, David Olsen (VK4MDX) uses a design from ZS6BKW, which he calls an "optimized G5RV".  The performance of this antenna on bands ranging from 80 meters to 10 meters is quite good, with 15 meters being the only band not within the performance parameters of the ZS6BKW design.  In David's approach, 450 ohm ladder line is used as a 1:1 transformer into a length of 50 ohm coaxial cable, which runs into your transceiver.  The dipole is an electrical 1.35 wavelength (see illustrations).  In order to get critical measurements right, David recommends the use of an antenna analyzer.  Some cut and trim will be required to get this antenna to work properly.

Some of the comments attached to David's article offer helpful guidance in case you experience difficulties building this antenna.

If you follow David's instructions closely, you'll have a much improved version of Louis Varney's original G5RV antenna without the need for an antenna tuner.
This antenna would make a great weekend project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, May 2, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--HyEndFed 5 Band HF Antenna Installation. Post #764.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/kGyAveQsf60.  Here's another antenna idea for those of us living on small city lots.  In this video, Tracy ("Outdoors On The Air") uses a HyEndFed 5 Band HF Antenna to get some interesting contacts on a cold day. His 75-foot/22.86 meter end-fed antenna seems to do well, even without a counterpoise wire or extensive radial ground system.  I've found that end-fed wires usually need a counterpoise or radial system to function at peak efficiency and to keep unwanted rf out of the shack. I usually keep it simple:  I attach a counterpoise wire for the lowest frequency in use to the ground lug of my Drake MN-4 antenna transmatch.  That seems to work fairly well and keeps rf outside where it belongs.  None the less, Tracy's video is well-done and offers plenty of suggestions for those radio amateurs living in compromised situations. For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Stealth HF Antenna for your HOA Yes it can be done! - AF5DN


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/mLDeuEyV_qM. A helpful, well-paced tutorial on how to set up a stealth antenna in a home or apartment governed by an HOA or CC&R. The task of designing, building, and installing a stealth antenna is no easy task, but if you are careful and pay attention to the geography, natural features, and building arrangement of your HOA/CC&R home, you can succeed in getting a working antenna for your location.  Be sure to have an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") and a counterpoise or ground radial system in place. You can either build your own antenna or use a commercial model from such companies as Maple Leaf Studios.  This is post #763 of a continuing series on Simple Ham Radio Antennas.  For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.  Thanks for joining us today!  Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).