Sunday, July 31, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Getting around HOA antenna restrictions. Post #852.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psUdNEfDIc4.  Here's another antenna idea for those radio amateurs living in deed-restricted homes or apartments.  In this video, "signa2424" uses a LDG S9v31 telescoping mast to support a HF vertical antenna.  The radial system consists of 24 ground radial wires made from CAT 5 cabling.  The antenna is raised only during operations. It's nested on the ground when operations are over.  Signa2424 notes that his fiberglass pole is painted green and and blends in well with his surroundings.  He also knows when the HOA conducts its inspections.  Of course, an unannounced inspection could reveal the presence of the antenna, raised or not.  The design, placement, and use of a "stealth" antenna take some forethought and planning. Don't assume all HOA inspections will be done according to a pre-set schedule. Other than unannounced HOA inspections, this antenna appears fairly safe and immune to neighbor's eyes.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, July 30, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Deploy-Anywhere Vertical HF Antenna. Post #851.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.watch?v=spWdV-So0iA. Fascinating and interesting tutorial from Cliff of the "QRP School."  Cliff's deployable HF antenna covers all amateur radio bands from 20 meters through 6 meters and can be used almost anywhere with no separate supports needed.  His portable "go kit" consists of a 17-foot/5.18 meters telescoping steel antenna from MFJ, a small tripod, a large Jaw C-clamp, 50-feet/15/24 meters of 50 ohm coaxial cable, a plastic tent stake, and a radial system that attaches to the tripod or C-clamp.  You can change the antenna frequency by adjusting the length of the telescoping steel rod.  The radial system consists of quarter wavelength wires cut for each band. This antenna kit is so small that you can make an extra one for your vehicle or use as a spare for your normal antenna system. An excellent weekend project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, July 29, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--W5TOM Stealth Antennas. Post #850.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box:' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UgoY2nvUds.  In this video, Tom Morton (W5TOM) discusses several antenna configurations suitable for deed-restricted homes or apartments. Tom shows how easy it is to disguise a vertical, loop, inverted V, a dipole, and a random wire antenna so that it remains undetected by neighbors.  Tom also reviews the importance of using a good rf ground, a sturdy antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"), and a fool-proof wire launching system. He briefly touches upon the use of a lightweight telescoping fiberglass mast to support vertical and inverted V antennas.  This video should give you a few good ideas on how to design and use your own stealth antenna. Remember the old saying:  "Out of sight-out of mind."

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--The Doctor will see you now--magnetic loops. Post #849

The Doctor will see you now! Magnetic Loops.
(http://www.arrl.org/news/view/the-doctor-will-see-you-now).
Accessed on 28 July 2016, 21:26 hrs, UTC.
Reporters:  Steve Ford (WB8IMY) and Joel Hallas (W1ZR).
Please click link to find information about this podcast.

Comment:

Every two weeks, "QST" Editor in Chief Steve Ford (WB8IMY) and the "Doctor" himself, Joel Hallas (W1ZR), discuss a wide range of technical topics relating to amateur radio.

This week's podcast (28 July 2016) investigates "Magnetic Loops"--small, portable HF antennas that are growing in popularity among QRP enthusiasts and those living in deed-restricted housing.

You can e-mail your questions to the show at doctor@arrl.org.

You can download the podcast through Apple iTunes, Blubrry or Stitcher.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--W5TOM Field & Emergency Antennas. Post #848.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMwRZVi-IOA.  If you need a cheap, effective emergency antenna for portable or home operations, then this video from Tom Morton (W5TOM) may help you reach that goal.  In this video, Tom discusses the various pieces of equipment you'll need to assemble and build an emergency antenna that is cheap, durable, and effective. Tom reviews several antenna "tuners" that will help you match the antenna to your rig, offers suggestions on wire sources, describes several antenna launching schemes, and offers several coaxial connectors that will help you interconnect your equipment to the antenna.  Tom then demonstrates several designs at a public park and at his home.  An excellent video for antenna experimenters.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ  (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Amateur Radio Related Uses For Raspberry Pi [Slides]. Post #847

Amateur Radio Related Uses For Raspberry Pi [Slides]
(https://dzone.com/articles/amateur-radio-related-uses-for-the-raspberry-pi-sl).
Accessed on 26 July 2016, 21:35 hrs, UTC.
Reporter:  Kevin Hooke (KK6DCT).
Please click title link to read the full article and to view the slides.

Comment:

An excellent slide show presentation on the use of the Raspberry Pi microprocessor for amateur radio projects.

This well-done slide program was presented to members of the River City Radio Communications Society this month by Keven Hooke (KK6DCT).

The program consists of 31 slides which describe how you can integrate the Raspberry Pi microprocessor into various phases of your amateur radio operation. Most of the projects are simple, inexpensive, and fun to use.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, July 25, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--More Magnetic Loop Antenna Work. Post #846

More Magnetic Loop Antenna Work
(http://www.w2lj.blogspot.com/2016/07/more-magnetic-loop-antenna-work.html?m=1).
Accessed on 26 July 2016, 03:10 hrs, UTC.
Reporter:  Larry Makoski (W2LJ).
Please click title link to read the full story.

Comment:

One of my favorite amateur radio websites is the QRP blog published by New Jersey ham, Larry Makoski (W2LJ).  He's always trying new things and isn't afraid to experiment with antennas, accessories, and rigs.

In this post, Larry describes his progress in making a QRP magnetic loop antenna tuned by a "homebrewed" capacitor box of his own design.  Magnetic Loop antennas are excellent for space-restricted radio amateurs or for portable operations.  Tuning magnetic loop antennas can be tedious because of their narrow bandwidth.

In years gone by, one could buy surplus Jennings air variable capacitors and be operational in no time.  Although these capacitors were often available, their cost discouraged many amateurs from using them.  Since then, there have been numerous tuning schemes using everything from coaxial cable to "homebrewed" capacitor tuning boxes, such as the one Larry is making.

Larry has illustrated his post with several excellent photographs, which should give you some idea of how to proceed if you want to design a similar system.

I can't wait until Larry has completed the tuning assembly and builds the magnetic loop for his station.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How to Build a 9:1 UnUn for Ham Radio Antenna. Post #845.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfnvqQeDLoQ.  Long wire HF antennas are great for both portable and home use if you have a good ground radial/counterpoise system and use a balun to match the antenna impedance to the impedance of your HF transceiver.  In this video, "Tinker John" (W5CYF) shows us how to make a simple 9:1 UnUn (unbalanced to unbalanced) for long or random length wire antennas.  John uses a T-130-2 core for the UnUn. John advises using thicker wire on the toroid if you plan to run more than 20 watts.  This simple, inexpensive project should only take a few hours to make.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Longwire Antennas for DXing. Post #844.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftBthATNdcg. If you have some space and feel a bit adventuresome, check out this high performance DX antenna using a parafoil kite.  In this video, Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) explains the theory, design, construction, and use behind this somewhat unusual antenna. Stan used a parafoil kite-supported 4 wavelengths long wire antenna on 7 MHz to attain reception that measured S9 +30dB. With a suitable ground system and a wide range antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") and balun, you could transmit a strong, low-angle signal from 80 meters to 10 meters. This could be an interesting antenna for the annual ARRL Field Day.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, July 22, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Zepp Antenna Theory. Post #843.


If you're having difficulty in viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwYSS335wZw. One of the classic multiband HF antennas you should try is the "Zepp" or "Zeppelin" antenna, which was once used on those huge German airships of the 1920s and 1930s.  In this video, Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) explains the theory, design, and construction of this antenna.  He also compares the "Zepp" to other half-wavelength antennas, such as the half-wave dipole. A good, basic introduction to an antenna that is still used today.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--SOTA Antenna Ideas. Post #842.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpxLATs0FIo. Nicely-done, easily understood video from John Saunders (VK4BZ).  John discusses simple, effective antenna systems for portable amateur radio operations, especially those involved in the SOTA (Summits On the Air) program.  John offers some valuable suggestions on how to build light-weight, inexpensive antennas for SOTA and other portable operations.  Some of these ideas could be useful for radio amateurs living in HOA/CC&R controlled homes or apartments.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Wire multi-band Lazy H antenna for covering 13 Mhz to 30 MHz.

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If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WSmuDFWJcK. A good video presentation of a Lazy H Antenna that covers 13 MHz to 30 MHz, including the 27 MHz Citizen's band.  The video also offers some valuable tips on how to configure the 450 ohm ladder line used as a balanced feed line.  This video recommends using an external 4:1 current balun with your antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") to get multiband capability.  You may need some help in erecting this antenna, but the effort will be worth it in the modest gain you get from the Lazy H.

This is post #841 in a continuing series of articles and videos discussing amateur radio antennas.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, July 18, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Cheap, Quick, Easy to Build, Works Great QRP Portable Antenna!


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your blog search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YyZbQEUtyE4. This is post #840 in a continuing series on Amateur Radio Antennas. Another great and easily- followed antenna tutorial from "Tinker John" (W5CYF).  This simple portable antenna is perfect for backpacking or portable operations from a public park, beach, or even your backyard. John uses a few Dollar Tree earphone cases, some surplus wire, and a few inexpensive items from his ham shack to build a very effective portable QRP antenna.  The cost of wire has increased significantly over the past few years, so you may have to visit a few "garage sales" to get the wire you need.  You can use a telescoping, fiberglass mast to support the antenna in a horizontal, sloper, or inverted vee configuration.  A great antenna idea.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Water's Edge Portable DX: A half square antenna on 14 MHz


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8Zh1_Mntz0.  Another well-done video tutorial from Peter Parker (VK3YE).  In this video, Peter uses a 20 meter half square antenna to get some good DX at the sea shore.  The antenna consists of a wavelength of wire cut to frequency in a wide "U" configuration over ground.  Proximity to the shoreline certainly helps launch a low angle signal suitable for DX contacts.  You should get at least a 3dB gain out of this simple antenna.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!  This is post #839 in a continuing series about amateur radio antennas.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Vintage Hybrid Transceivers. Post #838.

Vintage Hybrid Transceivers
(http://www.eham.net/articles/36648).
Author:  James Benedict (N8FVJ)
Please click title or article link to read the complete report.

Comment:

This article by James Benedict (N8FVJ) is one of the more interesting reviews of vintage hybrid transceivers online.  A hybrid design uses a solid state receiver and a tube type transmitter, usually with 6146 finals.

Benedict concentrates on early rigs produced by Yaesu and Kenwood, two companies that drove many U.S. manuafacturers out of business during the 1970s through the 1990s.

Many of us owned some of these rigs early on during our "careers" as radio amateurs.  Many of these rigs are still on the air and continue to receive outstanding reports of audio and transmission quality.

According to James, here are the vintage rigs worth saving, repairing, collecting, and using.

The Kenwood series of HF transceivers:

Kenwood TS-520s
Kenwood TS-530s
Kenwood TS-820s
Kenwood TS-830s

The Yaesu series of HF Transceivers:

Yaesu FT-101.
Yaesu FT-101E
Yaesu FT-101Z & ZD through the Mark II series
Yaesu FT-102

While this list is certainly impressive (I still use a Kenwood TS-520s), I would add the Drake C-Line of HF transceivers to the line up.  I have an old Drake 4C which needs some TLC (tender loving care) before I put it on the air.  The old power supply is dead, so I'll have to find some parts to get that thing going first. The one drawback of the old Drake equipment was the use of television sweep tubes in the final.  Such tubes are getting rare and are quite expensive to buy.

If you want a classic HF hybrid rig, try one of the transceivers listed above. While they may not have the competitive edge of current models, they are fairly easy to maintain and sound great over the air.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.
Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, July 15, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Doublet aerial for HF amateur ham radio short wave bands


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZmyvtMvEGY. Another great, easy-to-understanding antenna tutorial from Ray (G4NSJ). In this laid back and thoroughly engaging conversation, Ray explains the theory, design, and operation of the doublet antenna, one of my favorite multi-band antennas. Cut the antenna for the lowest band of use, feed the antenna with 300 ohm television twin lead, 450 ohm ladder line, or 600 ohm balanced line, and connect the feedline to your antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") with a 4:1 current balun. Run a short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable to your HF transceiver, and you're ready to explore a multitude of bands with just one antenna.  My doublet is designed for the 40 meter band and is configured as an inverted vee.  With a 450 ohm ladder line feeder, a 4:1 current balun, and my trusty Drake MN-4 "tuner", I can work the 40, 20, 15, and 10 meter amateur radio bands without any problems.

For the latest amateur radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres. Post #836.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKNE25ZNgu4.  One of these days, you may want to try a simple bi-square antenna for 10 meters. This antenna is simple, portable, and cheap.  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us how to build a simple bi-square antenna for the 10 meter amateur radio band.  If you follow his simple instructions, you should have a working antenna is a short period of time.  The construction is fairly easy:  Take two ten-meter pieces of wire and form them into a square with the ends at the top and bottom. Support is at the top of a small mast.  Tie off the sides to maintain a square or diamond shape.  Connect your feed line through an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner" or coupler) and check for SWR.  In this video, Peter was able to contact several stations using his QRP rig--a Yaesu FT-817. Good luck!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.
Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.
Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Slot antenna parabolic dish based 2m 440. Post #835.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I144kzJxzDA.  This video from James Sanders (AG6IF) presents another way of getting on 2 m and 70 cm without drawing attention to your station.  James uses an old parabolic dish antenna and cleverly converts it into a 2m/70 cm slot antenna.  The antenna blends in well with other satellite antennas in your neighborhood. James gives clear, concise instructions on how to make the 40-inch/101.6 cm slot and how to connect a SO-239 jumper at a point 4.5-inches/11.43 cm from the end of the slot.
James says the disguised antenna is vertically polarized and can be used on both 2 meters and 70 centimeters.  He also provides graphing of the antenna SWR and other antenna measurements.  This slot antenna would fit in nicely for those radio amateurs living in HOA/CC&R-controlled homes.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Solder a PL-259 and Ring Connectors to RG-8X (mini 8) Coax Cable. Post #834.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please enter this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABO45xFZCv8.  I've never been very good at attaching PL-259 and Ring connectors to coaxial cable. I can do the task, but I really don't like it.  I may have to change my mind after seeing this well-made, simply explained video from Dave Turlock (KG0ZZ).  It's really a simple process if one takes the job step-by-step and is careful about following the correct procedure.  In this video, Dave shows how he solders a PL-259 and the Ring Connectors to RG-8X (mini 8) coaxial cable.  He then shows how he makes connections for a 2 meter vertical dipole, a triband yagi antenna with dipole elements, and a small quad and quagi antennas.  Nicely done video.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, July 11, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Basics of Radio Wave Propagation. Post #833

Basics of Radio Wave Propagation
(http://www.ecjones.org/propag.html).
Accessed on 11 July 2016, 20:45 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Edwin C. Jones (AE4TM), MD, Phd.
Please click title link or enter the article URL into your browser search box.

Comment:

A fundamental understanding of Radio Wave Propagation is vital if radio amateurs are to run effective, efficient stations.

In this excellent tutorial from Edwin C. Jones, Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee, we get a basic explanation of Radio Wave Propagation and the workings of Earth's atmosphere, which can serve as a foundation for greater understanding of the natural forces that govern our radio signals.

Dr. Jones divides the presentation into easily understandable section, covering several important areas, including:

Aurora, backscatter, blind zone, Es, F2, grey line, LUF, meteor scatter, MUF, TA, TEP, ducting, and tropospheric scatter.

Dr. Jones also includes a brief discussion of the Earth's atmosphere and how solar radiation impacts propagation of radio waves.

The well-constructed article concludes with an extensive collection of terms and definitions used in studying radio wave propagation.  This essay should be part of every radio amateur's library, especially those of us who like to design and build our own antennas.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Trap Dipole Antennas. Post #832.


If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIS64xHIog0.  If you can't erect a full half-wavelength dipole at your QTH, why not try building a trap dipole?  Properly designed, a trap dipole antenna will be almost as efficient as a full-sized HF dipole antenna.  By following Stan Gibilisco's (W1GV) step-by-step explanation of the theory and construction practices behind trap dipoles, you should have little trouble building this antenna. Good luck!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--N3RR Lightning Protection Subsystems. Post #831.

N3RR Lightning Protection Subsystem
(http://www.users.erols.com/n3rr/lightningprotection/index.htm).
Author:  Bill Hider (N3RR).
Accessed on 10 July 2016, 05:31 hrs, UTC.
Please click title link or attached URL to view the full article.

Comment:

Lightning protection for your home and amateur radio station should be a prime concern when you build your antenna "farm" and set up your operating position. Even a nearby lightning strike can cause serious damage to your equipment and endanger your life.

In this well-organized tutorial on basic lightning protection and electrical safety, Bill Hider (N3RR), explains the steps necessary to protect your home, antennas, equipment, and your family.  This report should be part of your amateur radio reference library.

If you aren't able to install your equipment according to Bill's guidelines, please have a professional engineer advise you and hire an experienced utility crew to install the necessary safeguards.  This will be money well spent.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated regularly.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, July 8, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--3 ELEMENT HOMEBREW YAGI ANTENNA FOR 28 MHz

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If you're unable to view this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kjqo1TjBpQA. Nicely done video tutorial on how to design, build, and use a 3-element yagi for use on the 10 meter amateur radio band."SWIZZRADIOS 2008" used a lot of salvaged parts from other antennas to build this nice-performing antenna designed for 28.5 MHz.  Ten meters can be a lot of fun and challenge in a year of declining sunspots.  This antenna will give you a define "edge" when propagation favors your area.  A great weekend project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated regularly.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Building A Multi-Band HF Dipole Antenna. Post #829.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KHzsKYsZL0.  Here's another simple variation of the HF dipole antenna which can be built with commonly available materials.  This antenna is often called a "fan dipole" because elements for each band are "fanned out" from a common connection point.  If you design this antenna carefully, you'll have a multi-band HF dipole antenna that doesn't require an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  In this video, Glenn (The Radio Ham Guy--WD0AKX) shows us just how simple it is to design, build, and use one of these basic, effective dipoles. Glenn's dipole antenna covers the 40-20-15-10-and 6 meter bands. A well-done production with many helpful suggestions for the antenna builder.

For the latest amateur radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated regularly.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Introduction to Antennas. Post # 828.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=JYKEZATy4Fk. Excellent video tutorial on antenna basics from electronics engineer Don Clark. Unlike many flashy videos on the subject, Don gets right to the point in a professional, business like manner.  Nothing fancy, just straight to the point facts and basic theory.  The video presents complicated ideas simply and directly.  Don offers a lot of useful information to both the professional engineer and the radio amateur.  You should add this video to your amateur radio library.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed on this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Using a Smith Chart to Match Transmitter to Antenna Effectively. Post #827

Using a Smith Chart to Match Transmitter to Antenna Effectively
(http://www.radioworld.com/article/using-a-smith-chart-to-match-transmitter-to-antenna-effectively/278137).
Accessed on 05 July 2016, 23:33 hrs, UTC.
Author:  Mike Hendrickson of "Radio World."
Please click link or enter title link into your browser to read the full article.

Comment:

This is part 2 of Mike Hendrickson's exploration of SWR, VSWR, and Reflected Power.  In this well-constructed article, Mike show us how to use the Smith Chart to get a graphical representation of impedance, admittance, phase, wavelength, and reflection coefficient of an antenna system.  This chart, developed by Philip Smith in the 1930s has proven to be a valuable, useful tool for not only broadcast engineers but also for radio amateurs wanting to design efficient and safe antenna systems.  Mike explains the history behind the Smith Chart and explains how it can be used in a variety of applications.  The article contains plenty of illustrations and the simple equations necessary to use the chart effectively.  Once you work with the Smith Chart a few times and understand its basic principles, you will find it a valuable tool for antenna design and construction.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, July 4, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--ABCs of SWR, VSWR, Reflected Power and Return Loss. Post #826.

ABCs of SWR, VSWR, Reflected Power and Return Loss
(http://www.radioworld.com/article/the-abcs-of-swr-vswr-reflected-power-and-return-loss-27769).
Author:  Mike Hendrickson, "Radio World Engineering Extra."
Please click title link to read the full article.

Comment:

Thanks to "Radio World" and to broadcast engineer Mike Hendrickson for this excellent, easily understood, and concise explanation of Standing Wave Ratio, Voltage Standing Wave Ratio, and Return Loss.

Although this article is focused on the needs of professional broadcast engineers, there's plenty of good information for radio amateurs.  Mr. Hendrickson provides a helpful series of diagrams, equations, and superb photographs to illustrate the complexities of standing waves and how they affect transmitter and antenna performance.

An understanding of SWR and VSWR is necessary if we are to operate our amateur stations efficiently and safely.

Mr. Hendrickson has also created an excellent presentation on the Smith Chart and how that handy tool can help us design efficient, effective antenna systems. That article will be posted soon.
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For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, July 3, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--How To Use An Antenna Analyzer - Basics. Post #825.


If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOCG6bFGfuE.  A short, simple, concise, and informational tutorial from Randy Hall (K7AGE) on how to use the popular MFJ 259/269 Antenna Analyzer.  In this well-done video, Randy shows us how to check your antenna for SWR and resonance. Considering how expensive professional grade Antenna Analyzers are, the relatively inexpensive MFJ 259/269 Antenna Analyzers are a good bargain. Another great presentation by Randy!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--5 simple multiband wire antennas. Post #824

5 Simple Multiband Wire Antennas
(http://www.dxzone.com/5-great-multiband-wire-antennas).
Authors:  M0UKD, IW7EHC, EC2APU, HB9MTN, and W1GFH.
Accessed on 02 July 2016, 23:50 hrs, UTC.
Please click on title link or insert URL to read the complete article.


Comment:

If you're looking for a simple, easy to build multiband HF antenna that does not require an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"), then this well-crafted article from http://www.dxzone.com is for you.

This article recommends 5 simple wire antenna designs that will get you on the air quickly with a decent, effective signal.  Most of the antenna materials can be obtained from the nearest hardware store or building supply outlet.  The use of an "antenna tuner" will enhance the performance of these antennas.

1.  Homemade Carolina Windom from M0UKD.  This antenna is an off-center fed dipole with a 10-ft/3.04 meter vertical section. One antenna element measures 41-ft/12.5 m, while the remaining element measures 25-ft/7.62 m.  A 4:1 balun joins the antenna elements at top of the antenna.  The antenna needs no "tuner" for 40m, 20m, and 10m.  A "tuner" can be used to make all bands between 40m and 10m available to the operator.

2.  Multiband Wire Dipole (IW7EHC).  A simple, effective, no "tuner" antenna covering the 20m, 15m, and 10m bands.

3.  EC2APU Multiband wire antenna.  This antenna designed by EC2APU covers  the 80m, 40 m, 20m, 15m, and 10m bands.  The article is written in Spanish, but you should be able to build this antenna by just following the excellent illustrations.

4.  H-Pole Multiband Antenna (HB9MTN). This unique vertical antenna design from HB9MTN covers all amateur radio bands between 160m and 10m.

5.  The $4 Special from W1GFH.  This inverted vee dipole is one of my favorite antennas because it's cheap, easy to build, and covers 40m through 10m with an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  Each leg of the antenna is 33-ft/10.06 m long. The feedline can be tv twin lead, 450 ohm ladder line, or homemade balanced line.  I use a 4:1 current balun placed after my antenna transmatch to keep SWR under control.  My antenna support is an old MFJ telescoping fiberglass mast.

All of these antennas are simple, easy to make, and portable.
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For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).



Friday, July 1, 2016

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--K7AGE Ham Radio Field Day 2016. Post #823


If you can't access this video, please enter this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOXzSqNd6PY. Another great video from Randy Hall (K7AGE). In this well-made video, Randy takes us on a solo ARRL Field Day adventure on a hilltop outside of Gold Beach, Oregon--Randy's new QTH.  His station is a lesson in simple and effective portability.  His truck serves as the base of his Field Day Station, with a 20-ft/6.09 meter pole holding a 20 meter dipole antenna. Randy's Yaesu FT-857 is powered by a large capacity lead-acid battery which is charged by a 100 watt solar panel.  I have a similar setup using a flexible telescoping fiberglass mast to support an inverted vee antenna. My power source is a deep cycle marine battery with a solar panel to keep the battery charged.  My rig is a near classic--the Yaesu FT-7 QRP rig. Other than these minor differences, our stations are quite similar.  Randy says he had good success with this basic portable system. Try this design and see if it works for you.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).