Tuesday, October 31, 2017

2 Meter J-Pole Antenna Build. Post #1297.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLqCtzqeQzI.

If you want to get a bit more performance out of your 2 meter rig or handheld, try using a J-Pole antenna made from locally available parts.  In this video, Matt Heere used an online J-Pole calculator and some "upcycled" copper plumbing pipe to make this sturdy, effective 2 meter antenna. According to Matt, this omni-directional VHF antenna delivers a small amount of gain--around 2dBi--which may be enough to get full quieting on your favorite repeater.  Matt says he's able to contact a repeater almost 50 miles/81 km from his shack.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, October 30, 2017

Random Wire Antenna Lengths. Post #1296


Random Wire Antenna Lengths
(https://udel.edu/~mm/ham/radio/randomWire/
Author:  University of Delaware.
Accessed on 30 October 2017, 2055 UTC, Post #1296.
Comment:

When you're on the trail, at the annual Field Day, or wherever a good antenna is unavailable, a random wire antenna "can save the day" if  you know its limitations.  This article does an excellent job of describing the theory, construction, and use of random wire antennas and the wire lengths you should avoid if you want an efficient, effective operation without excessive SWR.

Of particular note is the series of graphs showing various wire lengths to avoid for different sets of amateur radio bands. The basic guidance is clear:  "The fewer bands, the fewer high impedance regions to avoid."

According to the article, you want the wire antenna to be at least 1/4 wavelength long for each band you want to use.  For example, to work the 40 meter amateur radio band (7 mHz), make sure the antenna is at least 33-feet/10 meters long.  If you want to cover 80 meters and up, perhaps the W3EDP antenna, with a length of 84-feet/25.60 meters and a counterpoise measuring 17-feet/5.18 meters is the way to go.  In any case, a good antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") will help you reduce rf and SWR problems in your shack.  Properly designed and cut, a random wire antenna can give you hours of enjoyment in portable operations.

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Building The MEF-1 Half-Wave End-Fed Antenna Tuner. Post #1295.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRedmR9urE4.

If you use end- fed or random length wire antennas, an antenna transmatch or "tuner" is necessary to gain maximum efficiency of the antenna while protecting your HF transceiver from excessive SWR.  In this video from Gil, the "Radio Prepper", we learn how to assemble the MEF-1 Half-Wave End-Fed Antenna Tuner kit from EA3GCY.  The tuner can be configured for any amateur radio band between 40 meter and 10 meters.  This tuner is strictly QRP, with the power limit set at 10 watts.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these web sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, October 28, 2017

An ATU aerial tuning unit for short wave HF end fed aerials. Post #1294.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=o43sAF4HwJs.

Ray of the "Radio Workshop" presents another outstanding video tutorial for radio amateurs.  In this video, Ray shows us how to design and build an "aerial tuning unit" for end fed wires, including inverted L antennas.

The project is a simple, effective, and inexpensive L match ATU which can be used for both Amateur Radio and the international shortwave broadcast bands.

Ray's easy going style makes often complex theory understandable and doable, even for those of us with limited construction skills. This easily-made L match ATU can be used for both home and portable operations.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233625).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (Kh6JRM).


Friday, October 27, 2017

Buddistick Ham Antenna Camping Set Up. Post #1293.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9m7XpgGkB4.

Camping and Amateur Radio make a great combination.  You get a chance to get some physical exercise, enjoy the great outdoors, and operate free from urban noise and traffic.  A well organized campsite makes an excellent base of operations for portable operations.  In this video from Tinker John (W5CYF), we see how a simple, easily assembled antenna made from the popular Buddipole Antenna System can be used on a campsite ham station.  Buddipole antennas are well-built, high quality, and deliver outstanding performance in a small package.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.  Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Tri-Band 20m 30m 40m Ground Plane Antenna. Post #1292.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=hZ6i2wqa8vo.

Here's an interesting three-band HF antenna you can build with commonly available materials and a little creativity. According to AB8XX, this ground plane antenna covers the 20, 30, and 40 meter amateur radio bands, is omnidirectional, and offers a low angle of radiation.  The feed point is approximately 20-ft./6.09-m above ground level.  Also intriguing in this article is the homebrewed antenna launcher based on a design published in the March 2009 issue of "QST."  The antenna spreaders are made from PVC pipe.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

The K2MIJ 30 meter "Limbo Stick" antenna. Post #1291.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=Lcoh5JXZOA.

Here's a strange, very shortened antenna that works well on the 30 meter amateur radio band (10.000 mHz to 10.150 mHz).  According to the author of this post, The 9-inch/22.86 cm vertical "halo" radiation section is made from AWG #10 wire and the loading coil uses 2-inches/5.08 cm of PVC pipe wrapped with AWG #26 to #14 wire.  The antenna displays a SWR below 2.0 for all frequencies in the 30 meter amateur radio band. Apparently, this experimental antenna works, although I suspect efficiency will be very low.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Extended Double Zepp Antenna. Post #1290.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j3BsYbzwvw.

If you want to squeeze a bit more gain out of your HF horizontal dipole antenna, you may find the Extended Double Zepp Antenna a useful alternative to the traditional 1/2 wavelength dipole.  Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) does an excellent job of explaining the theory, construction, and operation of this antenna.

The Extended Double Zepp Antenna is basically a collinear array of "two 5/8 waves in phase", giving a theoretical gain of 3 dB. Be sure to use balanced feed line such as 450 ohm ladder line, 300 ohm television twin lead, or homemade 600 feed line with a balanced "tuner" or a 4:1 current balun/"tuner" combination connected to your rig.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.Hawaii ARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353  (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, October 23, 2017

Ham radio HF stealth dipoles ON-AIR test and review. Post #1289.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rujoKVOhK8.

Radio amateurs residing in deed-restricted apartments, condominium units, and homes face severe antenna challenges.  In this video from "Ham Radio Concepts", we see some tests and reviews of stealthy, ultra lightweight dipole antennas made by N9SAD.  Considering the limitations faced by these antennas, they perform quite well.  If you're discouraged by your HOA/CC&R regulations, you may want to consider one of these stealth antennas from N9SAD.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ l(KH6JRM).

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Homebrew Antenna Launcher-Ham Radio. Post #1288.


If you can't views this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unIiqNuzHNI.

If you enjoy working the lower HF bands (160 meters through 40 meters), tall structures such as trees are a must to get antennas high enough to make DX contacts a regular event.  Over the years, many radio amateurs have made antenna launchers that will shoot your antennas over trees and other structures. In this video from Tinker Tom (W5CYF), we learn how to build a simple and inexpensive antenna launcher that will cost you less than $25.00 and take only 30 minutes to assemble.  The components are simple:  a slingshot, a support arm, and a casting fishing reel with a sinker attached.  Tinker Tom has used this basic tool to launch antenna wires to heights between 75 and 100 feet (22.86 to 30.48 meters) above ground level.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Othe sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, October 21, 2017

A radial plate for cheapskates. Post #1287.


A radial plate for cheapskates
(https://www.eham.net/article/38076).
Author:  Bill Savage (K3AN).
Accessed on 21 October 2017, 2055 UTC, Post #1287.
Please click link to read the full article.
Comment:

I've always enjoyed designing, building, and using "homebrewed" 1/4 wavelength vertical antennas. In the past, my ham radio shack has been located in areas where a full-length dipole antenna is impractical, especially for 80 and 160 meter operations. Vertical, sloper, and inverted vee configurations have worked well, considering my limited horizontal space.

While building vertical antennas is educational and often fun, finishing the necessary counterpoise or ground radial system has proven to be tedious and time consuming.

One way to deploy a ground radial system without much fuss is to use a metal radial plate as a connecting point for your vertical antenna counterpoise or ground radial system.  Several manufacturers make and sell these ground plates, and most of them have received excellent reviews in the amateur radio news media.  The only drawback is the cost.

In this article by Bill Savage (K3AN), we learn how some common household sink products can cut the cost of a metal radial plate. This article originally was published by www.eham.net on 30 April 2009.

Bill says the path to a homemade metal radial plate begins at the nearest home improvement center or neighborhood hardware store:

It's nothing more than a replacement kitchen sink strainer that you can buy at Home Depot or Lowe's for about $2.00. It's made from stainless steel and is “pre-drilled” for 10-24 size screws. You can readily install ten screws and nuts in the outermost ring of holes, and another five in the next ring. Install two solder or crimp-type terminal lugs under each nut and there's your 30-radial capacity. Furthermore, as shown in the photo, the strainer's center hole is large enough to fit over a copper-clad ground rod. You just have to remove the rubber stopper and pull out the metal center stem.

0x08 graphic



In my installation, each screw is fastened to the strainer with a compression lockwasher and nut. Then the radial lugs are placed over the nut and secured by a second nut. To prevent “galling” or seizing up of the stainless hardware, I placed Noalox grease on the screw threads. I also placed some grease on the flat surfaces of the lugs. Home Depot and Lowe's carry Noalox in the electrical section.

This would make an excellent weekend project.  Just follow Bill's instructions and you'll have a homemade metal ground plate for your 1/4 wavelength vertical antenna in only a few hours.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.

https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

http://www.arrl.org

http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).

https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-147623615).

Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).

Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).


Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Friday, October 20, 2017

Ham Radio 10 Meter Ground Plane Antenna. Post #1286.


If you can't view this article, please enter this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=aLgFeTpIX4A.

In this video from Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ), we get a step-by-step tutorial on how to design, build, and use a 10 meter ground plane antenna.  The antenna can be supported on a mast using a simple counterpoise as the ground plane or as a ground-mounted vertical employing a ground radial system.  In my experience, mounting the antenna at a height of approximately 1/2 wavelength (16.5 feet/5/03 meters) above ground level,along with a simple counterpoise or drooping radial system will give better performance than leaving the antenna mounted close to the ground.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News 7 Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Ham Radio - Viewer Request - My home HF antenna solution, 160-10 on a ...


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9o0pIMeKR7w.  This is post #1285 in a continuing series of "Simple Ham Radio Antennas."

This video from Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW) is a good example of what can be done to cover the amateur radio bands from 160 meters through 10 meters with a few simple antennas, ranging from Off-Center Fed Dipoles (OCFD) to inverted vees.  At look at Kevin's current antenna arrangement may give you some excellent ideas on adapting multiband HF antennas to fit your unique housing and land situation.  The important thing is to get on the air.  Some compromise antennas do very well if we're willing to accept less-than-perfect performance.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Emergency Antenna Platform System (EAPS). Post #1284.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFAj2rSPILA.

Here's a handy device for erecting emergency antennas in parking lots--just right for Field Day activities or portable operations.  The device is made by the Boca Bearing Company.  Be sure it's legal to attach this device to lamp posts, which may be owned by city, county, or federal agencies. Still, this is a great idea if you didn't pack a telescoping fiberglass mast in your "Go Kit."

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.Hawaii ARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Rat Tails and Counterpoise adapters for VHF Rubber Duck Antennas. Post #1283.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-JqK7w_1d8.

Are you disappointed in the performance of the stock "rubber duck" antenna that came as standard equipment on your HT?  You're not alone.  The "rubber duck" antenna is sometimes no better than a "dummy load", especially if you're trying to hit a distant repeater.

In this video from "Mountain Parameters", we learn about a quick and easy antenna attachment that will help improve the efficiency and range of your "rubber duck" HT antenna.  A simple, effective, and inexpensive improvement that can be made for any HT antenna is the creation of a "counterpoise" made from cheap, locally available components. This homemade "counterpoise" creates a virtual ground plane, by adding the "missing half" to your HT's antenna. This simple device is often called a "Rat Tail."  This wire attachment to the base of your HT's antenna will improve the efficiency of the antenna and permit better connections to repeaters or simplex stations.  If you enjoy hiking or camping, be sure to pack one of these "counterpoise" wires in your "go kit."  This simple attachment may make the difference between having a contact or losing one.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, October 16, 2017

Ham Radio - Super cheap antenna insulators. Post #1282.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrrJxWK0NNM.

You'd be amazed at the materials you can use for your antenna projects.  For example, take the case of antenna insulators.  While you can buy profession ceramic insulators on line, why not build them yourself with materials found in your home or at the nearest building supply/hardware store?  In this video, Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW) used something called "Campbell Plastic Clips" for his antenna insulators.  They seem to work well and stand up to varying weather conditions.  I've used electric fence egg insulators, pvc pipe, and even thick rubber bands for my homemade antenna insulators.  Be creative and see what you can find for your next antenna project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Making and Using a Simple 40-m Dipole (#86)> Post #1281.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfLUrVnnQUI.

Here's another great video tutorial from David Casler (KE0OG).  In this video, Dave shows how simple materials around your home can be used to make an effective 40-meter dipole antenna.  If you had to buy the materials at a neighborhood home improvement outlet or hardware store, your total cost would be less than $30.00.  I've built several dipole antennas following Dave's instructions, and each one has worked well, considering the cost. If you use coaxial cable as a feedline, your 40-meter antenna can be used on the third harmonic for 15-meter operation. If you use a balanced feeder, along with a 4:1 current balun and an antenna "tuner", you can have multiband capability from 40 meters through 10 meters.  This simple antenna will serve you well.  Erect it as high as you can.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Balanced 450 Ohm ladder Feedline Though Interior Walls, Foundation, and ...


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv0nsRTSoiw. This is post #1280 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

Although I prefer balanced feedlines for my homebrewed antennas, they sometimes prove difficult to install because of limitations imposed by your home's or apartment's structure.  In this respect, coaxial cable feedlines have a definite advantage.  In this video from KJ4KAF, we see how a little creativity can overcome some of installation challenges presented by balanced feedlines. Generally, balanced feedlines such as 450 ohm ladder line, 300 ohm television twin lead, and homemade 600 ohm feedline show lower losses than coaxial cables. Balanced feedlines, along with a sturdy antenna transmatch ("tuner") and a 4:1 current balun will allow multiband use from a single HF dipole antenna.  Hopefully, this video will give some suggestions on how to use a balanced feedline in your shack.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
htps://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for visiting us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, October 13, 2017

HAM RADIO RV MOTORHOME BUG OUT BOONDOCK. Post #1279.


If you can't view the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIpmSObR0M.

Whenever you go on holiday or vacation, be sure to take amateur radio with you, especially if you plan to travel self-contained in a RV motorhome.  This excellently produced tutorial shows some of the rigs, antennas, and equipment that can be incorporated into a motorhome.  Amateur Radio is a great asset during a "bugout" or "boondock", where local cell phone, TV, or FM radio are not available.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, October 12, 2017

The SummerLoop II 14 - 50 MHz pedestrian mobile magnetic loop. Post #1278.


If you can view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=kykqimN7nvI.

Here's another fascinating antenna design from Peter Parker (VK3YE).  In this post, Peter shows us his "SummerLoop 14-50 MHz pedestrian mobile magnetic loop antenna."  Construction seems fairly easy and will give you a good chance to experiment with magnetic loop antennas, be they mobile or not.  In this design, Peter says he has given a previous magnetic loop "a revamp with improved performance and coverage."  Peter uses a Yaesu FT-817 QRP rig to demonstrate the capabilities of this antenna.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres. Post #1277.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser inbox: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKNE25Ngu4.

Here's another very good, simple antenna that costs little while delivering great performance on the band of your choice.  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us how to build a bi-square antenna for the 10 meter amateur radio band.
Construction is easy--form a square with the ends at the top and bottom. Support the top with a telescoping fiberglass mast ("squid pole").  Connect the bi-square to a simple homebrewed L "tuner" and run a piece of coax to your rig--in this case a Yaesu-817 QRP transceiver.  Since the SWR could be high, you may want to used balanced feed line into the "tuner".  As you can see from the video, Peter did get some contacts.  This is a fun antenna that won't cost you much money. If you're ambitious, build one of these antennas for 40, 20, or 15 meters.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these sites:

http://www.Hawaii ARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).




Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Antenna Information for Emergency Communications. Post #1276.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNXvuv83ZNc.

Thanks to "Commsprepper" for this handy, useful chart of VHF/UHF frequencies for amateur radio, MURS, Marine, and GMRS services.  The chart contains specific lengths for antennas covering 136 mHz through 520 mHz.  Use the formulas on the chart to compute the exact length of a 1/2 wavelength dipole antenna. You can cut the measurements in half for a 1/4 wavelength vertical antenna.  I have a similar chart mounted on the wall of my ham shack for easy reference.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, October 9, 2017

ARRL: Puerto Rico-Caribbean Recovery. Post #1275.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser searchbox: https://youtu.be/HpJkY3-dJf4.

For today's post, I'm diverting a bit from antenna experiments to bring you up to date on what's happening to communications in hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico and in other Caribbean islands impacted by Hurricane Maria.

This video is taken from "Ham Radio Nation", program 320.  In this video, Dr. Bob Heil (K9EID) discusses hurricane recovery efforts in Puerto Rico with ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher (NY2RF).  The ARRL has sent volunteer radio amateurs to the stricken island and to other nearby islands to help first responders with emergency communications and to assist public service agencies, such as police and fire departments, hospitals, The American Red Cross, and other community services repair and extend emergency communications to the entire island.

You can view the entire program at this site:

https://twit.tv/hn/320.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Ham Radio Antennas - Rebuilding the L network QRP antenna tuner. Post #1274.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-fuQz0-xbc.

A nicely done video from Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW) showing how a homebrewed qrp antenna "tuner" can be reworked to fit inside a small box. The L network tuner is ideal for QRP operations in the field and at your home station. The "tuner" is easily built with readily available materials.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, October 7, 2017

Enabling ham radio channels in wireless 802.11 devices (updated). Post#1273.


If you can't view this video, please insert this Title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXptUTUCwAM

A simple, basic tutorial from KB9MWR on how to enable ham radio channels in wireless 802.11 devices. The video contains an excellent description of the antennas best suited for this purpose.  This "how-to" video includes a couple of AirOs and DD-WRT screen shots.  High speed multimedia using part 15 wireless internet can be the foundation of a MESH system for your neighborhood. Detailed information on this system can be found at: http://www.qsl.net/kb9mwr/projects/wi.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).


Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, October 6, 2017

Ham Radio Mast for Antenna | Setup. Post #1272.


If you can't view this video, please insert the title URL into your blog search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=ob53Zsp-ja8.

Telescoping fiberglass poles are useful for supporting a variety of antennas from inverted vees to horizontal dipoles.  In this video from "AnyThingWithWheels" we see just how easy it is to assemble, build, and use a MK-4-HD pole to support HF antennas.  In this video, "AnythingWithWheels" extends the pole to 25 feet/7.62 meters to support his antenna high above ground.  This telescoping pole is fairly lightweight at 17.3 pounds/7.86 kilograms, making it good for portable operations.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com..
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Building a trap dipole for 7 and 14 MHz. Post #1271.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbEAwAG1KMA.

According to Peter Parker (VK3YE), "A trap dipole is a good choice if you only want operation on two or three bands and don't want to adjust an antenna coupler to change between them."  In this well-produced, easily understandable tutorial, Peter takes us step-by-step through the design, construction, and use of a trap dipole for the 40 meter (7 MHz) and 20 meter (14 MHz) amateur radio bands.  Of course, you could design this antenna for other bands, such as 80/40 meters and 15/10 meters.  Other than winding some coils, the antenna is simple, effective, and fairly inexpensive.  This antenna would make a good weekend project.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http:/www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated every Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

What is a loading coil? Post #1270.


If you can't view this video, please insert this URL title into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF8-UrXqUVA.

A good, basic discussion of the theory and use of loading coils.  Loading coils are used to reduce the physical length of a resonant antenna and are found in a variety of home made and commercially-available antennas.  This video from Carl Lewis simple, hands on, and to the point.  Keep a copy of this video in you ham radio library for future reference.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast whic is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining me today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

J Pole Antenna for 2 Meters. Post #1269.


If you can't view this video, please insert this URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UABXDyu_hsE.

Here's a nice weekend project that will improve the performance of your 2 Meter equipment.  In this video from "drez20001", we get a complete tutorial on how to design, build, and use a J Pole Antenna for the popular 2 Meter amateur radio band.  The antenna is sturdy, portable, and will give you modest gain on this popular band.  The only drawback to this antenna is the cost of copper pipe used for the antenna sections.  You could substitute aluminum for the copper and save some money.  Another alternative to using copper would be to build the antenna from PVC pipe and use #14 AWG house wire for the radiating elements.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast that is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430280353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interet:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-14l76233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, October 2, 2017

2 minute portable HF vertical antenna: Using velcro tape for mounting. Post #1268.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://wwww.youtube.com/watch?v=WHCNNRX8944.

Here's another clever idea from Peter Parker (VK3YE). In this video, Peter shows us how a telescoping fiberglass rod, some wire, and a roll of velcro tape can get you on the air in less than two minutes.  This small antenna kit could be stored in your vehicle or home for portable or emergency operations. If you can't find velcro tape, use any type of binding material, such as twisty ties, bungee cords, or plastic garbage bag ties with serrated edges.  A simple solution to an issue that has plagued many portable stations.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast that is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430280353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, October 1, 2017

2-Meter/VHF HAM Radio Emergency Setup. Post #1267.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMjwDSgo1so.

Amateur Radio emergency communications and portable stations are making headlines in hurricane-ravaged areas of the Caribbean and in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.  Radio amateurs are using emergency antennas, portable rigs, and alternative energy sources to get messages out of the heavily damaged island. Perhaps, it's time for you to build an emergency station for local emergencies. Here is a portable 2-Meter/VHF Ham Radio station suitable for quick deployment worldwide.  In this video from The Philippines, "NapstersGear" shows us a simple, easy-to-erect 2-meter ground plane antenna that should be in your emergency "Go-Kit."  The antenna takes only a few minutes to assemble and use.  Most of the components for this antenna can be rolled up and carried in a bag.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast that is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (https://paper.li/f-1476233615).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).