How High Should a Dipole Be? A Look at Antenna Modeling (#100). Post #1363.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1Lz-TjdJAY.

An often asked antenna question is "How High Should a Dipole Be?" As a general rule, "get it up as high as you can" seems to work for most dipole installations. 

In this video, David Casler (KE0OG) turns to EZNEC antenna modeling software to get a definitive answer.  The "old rule of thumb" of one-half wavelength is correct, but, according to David, the answer is far from simple.  There are all kinds of things to consider, including ground conditions, proximity to buildings, trees, and other objects on your property, and even the type of feed line you use.

David's video is an excellent tutorial on dipole antennas and antenna modeling.  He offers a variety of resources and references to help you design the best dipole antenna for your situation.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Other sites of interest:

Hawaii Science Digest (http://hawaiisciencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Digest (https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com).
Hawaii Intelligence Daily (https://paper.li/f-1482109921).
Hawaii News Digest (https://prgnewshawaii.wordpress.com).

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Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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