Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Tutorial: Demonstrating Capacitance, Inductance, Reactance and Frequency. Post #1417.


If you can't see this video, please enter this URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYUrAntsc5A.

Here's another great video from Peter Parker (VK3YE).  This time, Peter explores resistance, capacitance, inductance, and reactance and how they change with "applied frequency" in an antenna system.  The video also discusses complex impedances, low pass filters, and other factors that influence antenna performance.  An excellent guide to an often confusing and misunderstood topic.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this post are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Antenna Installation For Aluminum or Non Ferrous Trucks And Cars | weBoost. Post #1416.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4C77GHNCQQ.

Although this video is aimed at cell phone users and RV (recreational vehicle) enthusiasts, the presentation does provide some suggestions for anyone who uses mobile antennas on current vehicles.  Many cars and trucks these days have very little metal on which to attach an antenna and an antenna ground.  This video offers one way of dealing with that issue.  The video shows you how to use  an adhesive disc to mount a magnet antenna on your aluminum truck or car.  The adhesive discs are non-marring and will not damage your vehicle if they are installed and removed properly. The video lists a telephone number where you can ask for more information.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information(.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation information.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, February 26, 2018

Building a trap dipole for 7 and 14 MHz. Post #1415.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbEAwG1KMA.

A trap dipole antenna is a good choice if you only want to operate on two or three amateur radio bands and don't want to readjust an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"/"coupler").  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us how to make a simple, inexpensive trap dipole for the 40 meter (7 MHz) and 20 meter (14 MHz) amateur radio bands.  The principles described in this video can be applied to other antenna combinations, such as 30/40 meters, 80/160 meters, and 15/20 meters.  Peter's explanation of how to build the 20 meter trap is especially well done and easy to understand.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, February 25, 2018

My favourite magnetic loop for HF pedestrian mobile. Post #1414.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YswnVmAKSP0.

Peter Parker (VK3YE) has produced some excellent articles on pedestrian mobile antennas.  This video is one of Peter's earlier efforts where he designs and tests several magnetic loop antennas for mobile and emergency use.  Although Peter contends that "most HF pedestrian mobile activity seems to be on 14-28 MHz, where it's easier to build an efficient portable (antenna)...due to its activity and propagation, 7 MHz is also an excellent mobile band." 

In this video, Peter compares copper and aluminum magnetic loops for both 80 and 40 meters, and makes a few interesting contacts in an afternoon of pedestrian mobile operations.  For more details on Peter's magnetic loop antennas, please visit vk3ye.com

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Views expressed in this article are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, February 24, 2018

$4.00 Ham Radio Satellite Antenna. Post #1413.


If you can't see this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy_XwvMmIro.

You don't need expensive antennas or state-of-the-art transceivers to work FM Amateur Radio satellites such as SO-50.  Just follow the suggestions in this fascinating video from Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ) and you'll be "working the birds" in a matter of hours.  You can make modifications necessary for your particular situation and substitute parts that may give you more flexibility.  You could mount this simple antenna on a camera tripod or make the support boom from PVC pipe, which would also serve as a storage space for the antenna elements.  This project would be perfect for portable, emergency, or even home use.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hawaiihamradio.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information)

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, February 23, 2018

HF Dipole Wire Antenna Deployment Ideas, Hardware. Post #1412.


If you can't see this video, please enter this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3U6itfpSkN8.

A most informative and helpful video tutorial from GUERRILLACOMM on how to make an easy, field-deployable HF dipole antenna.  Most of the components for this project can be found at your neighborhood hardware, farm supply outlet, or home improvement store.  Just follow these suggestions, and you'll have an inexpensive, durable, lightweight, and efficient HF antenna.  You can get multi-band HF performance if you use balanced feed line into your antenna transmatch (i.e. tuner).

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, February 22, 2018

More 28 MHz QRP pedestrian mobile contacts. Post #1411.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www/youtube.com/watch?v=dsCt5iT2GOs.

Here's another great video from Peter Parker (VK3YE).  In this video, Peter goes pedestrian mobile on a sunset beach near Melbourne, Australia.  Even with 5 watts output from his Yaesu-817 and a homebrew magnetic loop antenna, Peter was able to make some impressive contacts. Of course, walking alone a beach with the ocean only a short distance away, probably helped launch a decent signal.  Peter has several interesting pedestrian mobile and stealth antennas you may find interesting. Just go to vk3ye.com to see what Peter is doing.

Speaking of mobile antennas, please check out this article by Paul Signorelli (W0RW):  "Pedestrian Mobile Whip".  You can find this fascinating post at https://www.eham.net/articles/40538.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this article are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Cobra Antenna Project by W4ZJOH--160 Meter and up Restricted. Post #1410.


Cobra Antenna Project by W4JOH--160 Meter and up Restricted

(http://www.hamuniverse.com/cobraantenna.html).

Author:  Raymond A. Cook (W4OJH)--revised by N4UJW.

Accessed on 22 February 2018, 0147 UTC, Post #1410.

Please enter the title URL into your browser search box to read the full article.

Comment:

Here's a HF antenna that you don't see very often.  The Cobra Antenna, which can be used on Amateur Radio bands from 160 meters through 10 meters, first appeared in the June 1997 edition of "73 Magazine Amateur Radio Today."  In that article, Raymond A Cook (W4OJH) described a type of folded dipole made from standard insulated wire (about 14 gauge) and fed with 450 ohm ladder line into an antenna "tuner."  The antenna's name is an apparent reference to the antenna's "S-Shaped" configuration of its multi-band elements.  The antenna works on its primary and harmonic operating frequencies as a standard ladder line fed dipole.

N4UJW does a nice job of summarizing the main features, required formulas, and construction practices needed to bring this unusual antenna to life.  Although N4UJW encourages you to build your own version of the Cobra Antenna, he does offer a few suggestions:

"Keep in mind that there are actually 3 conductors connected in series per side and folded back on each other..... or another way of saying this is that there is one continuous length of 210 feet per side in the 80 meter version connected to one side of the ladder line and the same on the other half. Because the Cobra antenna is a balanced load, it is recommended to install a 4:1 current-style balun at the station end of the feedline (many external tuners provide a built-in balun). Ladder-line feed may have to be trimmed for lowest SWR, but using about a 100 foot length seems to make for easier tuning on all bands.
 Extra feedline should be suspended in loose coils and not in a tight roll.

A 4:1 balan possibly could be installed at the antenna, then fed with 50 ohm coax to the radio, BUT, it is not known if this would upset any characteristics of the original design.

Experiment!

Raymond is quoted from the article..... 
"Some of our more skeptical, and perhaps knowledgeable, friends have expressed concern about impedance, power rating, wave-cancellation, etc.  All that we can offer as an answer is the slogan used for many years by the Packard Motorcar Company.Ask the man who owns one." ........W4JOH"
---------------------------
For the latest Amateur Radio News and Information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).



Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Wire Antennas for Dummies by Callum, M0MCX. Post #1409.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1_H-4dw31Q.

A near faultless presentation by Callum McCormick (M0MCX) covering basic theory, construction, and operation of dipoles, loops, and other wire antennas.  He clearly demonstrates what happens when you change the shape, height, and location of wire antennas. His explanation of loop antennas is particularly good.

Callum says he developed this video from a presentation he gave before his radio club.  This video would make an excellent discussion topic for your next club meeting or for helping those enrolled in a Foundation or Technician License Class.  You may want to download this video and keep it in your reference library.

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information--currently undergoing maintenance).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this post are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, February 19, 2018

A High Efficiency Extended Length Mobile Antenna. Post #1408.


A High Efficiency Extended Length Mobile Antenna

(http://w5jgv.com/mobile_antenna/).

Author:  Ralph M. Hartwell II (W5JGV).

Accessed on 19 February 2018, 2013 UTC, Post #1408.

Please click link or enter title into your browser search box to read the full article and view the photographs, graphs, and technical data.

Comment:

Operating a mobile amateur radio station can be lots of fun mixed with antenna, grounding, and installation problems common to vehicles.  In most cases, mobile amateur radio antennas tend to be small and inefficient.

In this article, Ralph (W5JGV) tries to overcome these restrictions by designing, buidling, and using a mobile antenna that is sturdier and longer than the usual mobile antenna.  Ralph's multi-band mobile antenna is 3.42 meters/11 ft, 2 in long from the top of the mounting spring to the top of the antenna itself.  A shorting strap is used to operate on the 15, 12, and 10 meter bands.  Center-loaded coils are used to operate and 40 and 160 meters.

Ralph's antenna is a well-crafted gem which can be used in mobile, home, and portable operations.

Ralph's construction project covers the following areas:

Evolution of the Antenna Design.
Comuted Radiated Efficiency of a cent-loaded mobile antenna vs a 1/2 wavelength dipole antenna.
Construction details--most materials can be found at your nearby hardware store or building supply outlet.
Four-position magnetic mount needed for roof installation.
Making the 40 and 160 meter coils.
Additional Loading Coil Data.
Tuning information:
"A center loaded vertical antenna will not present a pure resistive load at the base of the antenna. Usually, a matching network is added at the bottom of the antenna to cancel the reactance and transform the lower than 50 Ohm feedpoint resistance to something close to 50 Ohms. Since this antenna was designed to operate over several HF bands, a single matching network is impractical. Instead, I chose to connect the antenna through a length of low-loss coaxial cable to an automatic antenna tuner (ATU) inside the vehicle within reach of the operator and out of the weather.
To make the best use of the antenna with this set-up, the loading coils for the antenna should be tuned to resonance at the high end of each band. The antenna will then look electrically "short" to the tuner, which will then be able to tune the antenna to the desired operating frequency. If the loading coil in the antenna is tuned to a frequency below the top of the band, then operation above that critical frequency will cause the antenna to look electrically "long" to the RF. The loading coil will begin acting as a choke and effectively reduce the length of the antenna, causing a severe loss of gain.
Final Notes:
The top whip represents a (measured) capacity of 17.5 pF. This value changes by about 0.75 pF as the mast is moved +/- 60 degrees from vertical in any direction.
The tuning of the antenna stays fairly constant as the whip sways, so compensation for bending of the antenna while driving is not necessary, at least not on this vehicle."

Overall, this is an excellent tutorial on how to design, build, and use a high efficiency mobile antenna.  If you make this antenna, be sure to avoid low hanging branches and low highway overpasses.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this article are those of the reporter and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, February 18, 2018

K7PP's Multi Band Fan Dipole Project Ham Radio. Post #1407.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXqSY5JKQzs.

You can still design, build, and use a multi band HF dipole antenna even if you don't have an antenna "tuner", "traps", or a lot of space.  In this video, K7PP shows us step-by-step how he created an efficient "Fan Dipole" antenna for his medium-sized back yard.  Just follow the easy directions in this video and you soon will have an efficient, relatively inexpensive, and effective multi band HF dipole antenna for your station.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these web sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information)--temporary URL.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this article are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, February 17, 2018

HF Field Ops Gear-up. Dipole Antenna Tuning. Post #1406.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgdP8ao71Cc. You should also get the author's script and a list of NVIS technical references.

This exceptionally well-done video from "GUERRILLACOMM" shows you how to design, build, tune, and operate a NVIS (Near Vertical Incident Skyway) antenna for portable or emergency use.

According to the author, this low-lying NVIS dipole antenna is designed for 7 MHz (40 meter amateur radio band) and will cover local, state, and regional areas near your home.  It's always a good practice to test your portable antennas before you go to the field so you can make adjustments without stress or strain.

Reaction to the video has been favorable, with suggestions ranging from wire trimming to best height above ground for efficient operations.

Carl (N6CKV) suggests "Rather than cutting the wire to tune your antenna, try to fold the excess length back onto the antenna so if you make it too short you can easily lengthen it..."

And long time QRP enthusiast, Julian (OH8STN), recommends the height of the 40 meter NVIS antenna to be around 10-13 feet (3.04-3.96 meters) above ground.

NVIS antennas are well-suited for local and regional communications.  You can get more information on this type of antenna by "googling" NVIS Antennas.

-------------------------------------------------------

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, February 16, 2018

Jeri Ellsworth, AI6TK, and Amy Herndon, AI6ZU, at Quartzfest 2018 Part 2. Post #1405.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=RXGp6TBBMFQ.

This video from Randy Hall (K7AGE) is part 2 of an extended interview with Jeri Ellsworth (AI6TK) and Amy Herndon (AI6ZU) during the couple's visit to Quartzfest 2018 in Arizona.

In this video, Randy, Jeri, and Amy go outside the RV (recreational vehicle) to examine the antenna system for their vehicle.  Some of the ideas discussed in this post could be helpful for radio amateurs who operate under severed restrictions, such as HOAs and CC&Rs.  Overall, an excellent interview with some fascinating rig and antenna ideas.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these web sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://paper.li/kh6jrm/1430289353 (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

The views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Jeri Ellsworth, AI6TK, and Amy Herndon, AI6ZU, at Quartzfest 2018 Part 1. Post #1404.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7-ttbOaLvM&t=78s.

A fascinating and educational video tutorial on how to create a portable amateur radio station for a RV (recreational vehicle).  Randy Hall (K7AGE) dropped by the 2018 Quartzfest in Arizona to interview Jeri Ellsworth (AI6TK) and Amy Herndon (AI6ZU) as they prepared to operate at this annual festival for RV owners.  It's interesting to note how Jeri and Amy worked around grounding and antenna problems to get their mobile station on the air.  Some of the suggestions discussed in this video could be useful for radio amateurs operating in deed-restricted properties (HOAs/CC&Rs).

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM(.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

KL7 5 Band Pipe Vertical 20-17-15-12-10 meter vertical. Post #1403.


KL7 5 Band Pipe Vertical 20-17-15-12-10 meter vertical

(http://www.hamuniverse.com/kl7jr5bandvertical.html).

Accessed on 15 February 2018, 0025 UTC, Post #1403.

Author:  John Reisenauer, Jr. (KL7JR).

Please enter post title in your browser search box to read the full article.

Comment:

Here's an interesting antenna project from John Reisenauer, Jr. (KL7JR) that could help those with limited space for a full dipole antenna.  John has provided an excellent diagram, materials list, construction notes, and photographs to help you build your own 5 band vertical antenna.  With a good antenna "tuner", low loss coaxial feed line, and a simple ground radial system, you could be on the air with a decent signal in a few hours.

Most of the materials for this multiband vertical antenna can be found at the nearest building supply outlet or neighborhood hardware store.

Here is a basic diagram of the antenna and the required material to get you started.  Please insert the post title into your browser to see the diagram.

Material List:
1 ea 10 foot 3/4 inch EMT conduit
1 ea 10 foot 1/2 inch EMT conduit
1 ea 102 inch CB whip
3 each hose clamps
Assorted bolts, nuts from junk box
Insulating support for base of antenna (3 inch)
Assorted # 12 wire or plumbers tape for radial ring
4 to 6 or more radials  + - 16 feet long from wire for each radial
---------------------------------------
For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

6 Meter EDZ Signal Squirter. Post #1402.


6 Meter Signal Squirter
(http://www.hamuniverse.com/6meteredz.html).

Reporter:  N4UJW.

Accessed on 14 Februrary 2018, 0400 UTC.

Please click link to read the full article. If the link is down, please enter the post title into you browser search box.

Here's a quick, easy, inexpensive 6 meter Extended Double Zepp antenna that will add approximately 3dB to your signal from its broadside bi-directional pattern when installed about a half wavelength above ground.

Most of the materials for this  "super dipole" antenna can be found at the nearest building supply or hardware store in your area. N4UJW recommends #14 AWG stranded copper wire for the antenna elements and a balanced feedline, such as 300 ohm television twin lead, 450 ohm ladder line, and even regular lamp cord.  A balance antenna "tuner" or a tuner/balun combination will be need to connect the EDZ to your 6 meter transceiver.

N4UJW offers this drawing and suggestions to make your antenna perform as it was designed:

"Below is a "crude" drawing of the antenna design....the pattern will be looking at you and away from you as with any standard dipole."



"You should end up with the approximate lengths shown in the picture drawing..."


"Solder the connections at the center insulator and seal well with electrical tape and some kind of sealer appropriate for outdoor use. (you want to make the connections water tight if possible)."

"Attach the ends of the downlead to the "balanced" terminals of your tuner,
fire up your 6 meter rig on 50.200mhz AM, using just enough power to check swr per normal procedures and trim antenna as needed for lowest swr as with any antenna project."
-------------------------------------
For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, February 12, 2018

Jim Heath W6LG Shares a video of one of the largest ham radio antennas. Post #1401.


Jim Heath W6LG shares a video of one of the largest ham radio antennas
(https://qrznow.com/jim-heath-w6lg-shares-a-video-of-one-of-the-largest-ham-radio-antennas/

Author:  Jim Heath (W6LG).

Accessed on 12 February 2018, 2151 UTC, Post #1401.

Comment:

Most radio amateurs have to be satisfied with restricted antennas because of zoning requirements, environmental issues, space limitations, or super sensitive HOAs and CC&Rs.  What if you could find a place where your antenna dreams could be fulfilled?

Thanks to Jim Heath (W6LG), I've found such a place.  In this post, Jim shares a video and photos of an installation belonging to Sam (R7AB)--If only I could afford a piece of land that would contain my antenna fantasies!  Anyway, enjoy the video and photographs.  This post may give you a few ideas for improving the "antenna farm" you now have.  Remember:  A compromised antenna is better than no antenna.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateuradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Magnetic Loop Mysteries Explained. Post #1400.


If you can't see this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?=SUYI81dkEMA.

This video from Ben G0CWT is a fascinating exploration of how to resolve some of the tuning issues involved with small transmitting magnetic loop antennas.  Ben says he has patented a way of feeding a small transmitting loop using a ferrite transformer to resolve problems surrounding current distribution, voltage distribution, radiation resistance, and impedance matching.  If you're have difficulty in making your homebrew magnetic loop antenna "behave", this video will give you interesting, workable solutions.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl--audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hawaiihamradio.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Saturday, February 10, 2018

MULTIBAND LOOP ANTENNA 80m - 10m. Post #1399.


If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pdxVc-gme.

With a little ingenuity and some suggestions from NG9D, you, too, can design, build, and use a full wavelength 80 meter loop on a small urban lot.  NG9D used materials already in his ham shack to build this effective, simple antenna that covers 80meters-10 meters with an antenna "tuner."  Be aware that the "light wire" used in this homebrew project can suffer ill effects from bad weather.  Despite the sag from ice and snow, the antenna still works.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateuradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Friday, February 9, 2018

5 Great Multiband Wire Antennas. Post #1398.


5 Great Multiband Wire Antennas
(https://www.dxzone.com/multiband-wire-antennas-projects).

Accessed on 09 February 2018, 20:06 UTC.

Please click link to view the full post and video.

If you need some new antenna ideas, check this website from https://www.dxzone.com.  This article describes five simple, easily made antennas that can get you many contacts with minimal cost:

The W5GI Mystery Antenna.
6-Band Windom Antenna from ON4AA.
The 4 Bander Dipole from VK5AH.
H-Pole Multiband Antenna from HB9MTN.
A dual-band wire beam fro 17 and 12 meters from KG4JJH.

As an added bonus, this website suggests several other antenna ideas worth pursuing, including an excellent multiband dipole video:

Multiband Wire Antenna Videos
For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hawaiihamradio.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog and video are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Thursday, February 8, 2018

YES! you need an antenna tuner. Post #1397.


If you can't see this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLTi3iiEJ_w.

To use or not to use an antenna "tuner" with your HF antenna--that question has bothered generations of radio amateurs as they try to squeeze out maximum performance while reducing SWR and RFI as much as possible.

According to this video's producer, Joe Laulima, there are several instances where an antenna "tuner" will improve station performance even if the antenna is resonant.  Joe goes against prevailing wisdom by saying "Yes! you need an antenna tuner" if only to compensate for environmental, space, grounding, and location issues--problems that can degrade any antenna.

Although Joe prefers to use "tuners" to maximize antenna performance, he's quick to note that these matching and coupling devices can't fix every antenna issue.  According to Joe, "An antenna tuner DOES NOT fix a non-resonant antenna--it just shows 50 ohms to the radio so all is good at the transceiver.  This allows you to transmit using the non-resonant antenna (to a point).  If there is a large mismatch, you will still transmit but you will have a lot of heat loss in the tuner so not so many watts will actually get out as RF."

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Water's Edge Portable DX: A half square antenna on 14 MHz. Post #1396.


If you can't see this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8Zh1_Mntz0.

Here's a simple 2-element phased vertical array that will give you some interesting results.  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) tests a half square antenna on 14 MHz (the 20 meter Amateur Radio Band).  The antenna consists of a wavelength of wire bent into a wide inverted "U" suitable for long distance HF contacts.

According to Peter, the antenna is simple and easy to make:  "Take 22 meters (72.16 ft) of wire and set up two poles 11 meters (36.08 ft) apart, with equal lengths hanging down. Connect one to an antenna coupler and load it against short counterpoise wire (s)."

You may be surprised just how good this antenna is.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Installing a Mobile Radio in Your Car. Post #1395.


If you can't view the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https;//www.youtube.com/watch/v=FzBDf-JEa3w.

A nicely done tutorial on how to install a mobile radio in your vehicle from Pete Hadley (K6BFA).  Peter does an excellent job of  showing how he mounted his mobile rig and antenna without drilling a large number of holes or defacing the body of his vehicle.  Notice how he kept all cables and wires safely out of sight.  This video should give you lots of ideas if you're planning on going mobile over the next few days.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News and Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this article are those of Pete Hadley unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Monday, February 5, 2018

Mobile Radio Antennas, Mounting Options, Performance Tips. Post#1394.


If you can't view the video, please enter this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fmm63d2Zyv4.

Operating a mobile HF/VHF/UHF amateur radio station is one of the fun activities enjoyed by licensed radio amateurs.  There are many contests and operating events specially designed for the mobile operator.  Mobile operations can expand your ham radio enjoyment while you get acquainted with the vast expanses of our country.

The installation of mobile antennas can be a bit tedious, considering the limitations, grounding problems, and power issues involved in today's modern trucks and passenger cars.  In this video, Creg Cottrell of Rugged Radios walks us through choosing the right mobile radio antenna, understanding ground planes, selecting mounting locations, vehicle mounting options, and basic trouble shooting associated with mobile antennas.  An excellent video tutorial with many helpful suggestions for the mobile operator.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this video are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Sunday, February 4, 2018

Windom Antenna. Post #1393.


. If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5P6OfZYzCUE.

One of the things I enjoy about antennas is the opportunity to build some of the classic antenna designs used in the early days of Amateur Radio. 

The Windom Antenna is a good example of an early antenna design which continues in a variety of variants today.

The modern Windom Antenna is a close cousin of the original off-center-fed dipole created by Loren Windom (ex-W8GZ) back in the early 1920s.  Windom's original idea was to design an off-center-fed (OCF) horizontal antenna to present a feed point impedance of around 600 ohms, close enough to match the surge impedance of a single-wire feed line.  Nowadays, variants of the Windom Antenna are fed by coaxial cable and a variety of balanced feed lines.

In this video from Stan Gibilisco (W1GV) we get a thorough understanding of the theory, design, construction, and use of a "modern-day" Windom Antenna using a variety of feed line configurations.

For more information on building your own multiband Windom Antenna please visit this website:

https://www.w8ji.com/windom_off_center_fed.htm.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com (Amateur Radio news for Hawaii radio amateurs).
https://bigislandarrlnews.com
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Saturday, February 3, 2018

The 30 Meter Ham Radio Band, 10mhz Amateur Radio, CW/PSK31/FT-8/JT65. Post #1392.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oH3GAnjB_Wo.

Here's a short video from the "HamRadioConcepts" youtube channel explaining the attractions of the 30 Meter Amateur Radio Band (10 MHz).  This video calls the 30 Meter Band a "hidden gem" because there's less noise and better propagation than some other ham bands. Especially interesting is a discussion of how digital modes such at FT-8, PSK31, CW, and JT65 can be used effectively on this band.  All it takes to enjoy this non-contest band is a simple dipole or vertical antenna.  Many modern transceivers include this band in their layouts in addition to the more "classic bands" we use everyday on HF.  Thirty meters is also a good place to practice and improve your CW skills.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://arrl.org.
http://arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday)
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more amateur radio news and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Friday, February 2, 2018

My Low Cost Magnetic Loop Antenna For 10-12 Meters


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=OJnp4BDST8U.

Here's an excellent antenna idea for those radio amateurs living in deed-restricted housing governed by HOAs and CC&Rs. 

This easily made magnetic loop antenna covers the 10-12 meter Amateur Radio bands and can be made from locally available materials.  The antenna can be used for  home, portable, and emergency use.

The video is clear, concise, and easily understood.  Although several companies produce magnetic loop antennas, it may be more fun "to roll your own".  If you feel ambitious, why not make a magnetic loop antenna for 40 and 20 meters?  You may be surprised just how well these small antennas work.  A compromise antenna is better than no antenna.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars and links for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


Thursday, February 1, 2018

Winter Field Day 2018 After Action Report. Post #1370.


If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnYIMAbKfCg.

A short while ago, I reported on how Julian (OHJ8STN) was preparing for The Winter Field Day event.  In that video, Julian outlined what was needed to survive and operate an Amateur Radio Station in a severe northern latitude (above 65-degrees north).

In this update of that adventure, Julian provides an excellent after-action report showing the benefits of planning, the practicality of using a "go-kit" for portable operations, and how to maximize your operational efficiency in an extremely cold environment.  Julian does an outstanding job of describing how to design, build, and use a "go-kit" for field operations.  Julian's suggestions can apply to many climatic situations, especially when he discusses the importance of pre-planning, pre-testing of equipment, and emergency procedures in extreme climates.  It's perhaps an excellent idea to test your "go-kit" in a variety of weather conditions--one never knows when a natural or human-made disaster will befall us.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these web sites:

http://wwwHawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday).
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
http://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).

Be sure to check the blog sidebars for more antenna and propagation articles.

Views expressed in this blog are those of the reporters and correspondents unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).